Supportive care needs, anxiety, depression and quality of life amongst newly diagnosed patients with localised invasive cutaneous melanoma in Queensland, Australia

Beesley, Vanessa L., Smithers, B. Mark, Khosrotehrani, Kiarash, Khatun, Modsina, O'Rourke, Peter, Hughes, Maria Celia B., Malt, Maryrose K., Zonta, Mark J., Bayley, Gerard J., Barbour, Andrew P., Brown, Lee J., D'Arcy, Justin, Allan, Christopher and Green, Adèle C. (2014) Supportive care needs, anxiety, depression and quality of life amongst newly diagnosed patients with localised invasive cutaneous melanoma in Queensland, Australia. Psycho-Oncology, 24 7: 763-770. doi:10.1002/pon.3718

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Author Beesley, Vanessa L.
Smithers, B. Mark
Khosrotehrani, Kiarash
Khatun, Modsina
O'Rourke, Peter
Hughes, Maria Celia B.
Malt, Maryrose K.
Zonta, Mark J.
Bayley, Gerard J.
Barbour, Andrew P.
Brown, Lee J.
D'Arcy, Justin
Allan, Christopher
Green, Adèle C.
Title Supportive care needs, anxiety, depression and quality of life amongst newly diagnosed patients with localised invasive cutaneous melanoma in Queensland, Australia
Journal name Psycho-Oncology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1057-9249
1099-1611
Publication date 2014-10-29
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1002/pon.3718
Volume 24
Issue 7
Start page 763
End page 770
Total pages 8
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective: The aim of this paper is to determine levels of supportive care needs, anxiety, depression and symptoms amongst patients newly diagnosed with localised invasive primary melanoma and if these varied amongst patients who had a sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB). We also considered quality of life compared with general population norms.

Methods: Patients newly diagnosed with clinical stage IB-II invasive melanoma were ascertained through Queensland hospitals, specialist clinics and pathology laboratories. Validated surveys measured 46 need items (Supportive Care Needs Survey–Short Form + melanoma subscale), anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) and quality of life and symptoms (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy–Melanoma). Regression models compared outcomes according to whether or not participants had a SLNB.

Results: We surveyed 386 patients, 155 before and 231 after wide local excision, of whom 46% reported ≥1 moderate-level or high-level unmet need. The three highest needs were for help with fears about cancer spreading (17%), information about risk of recurrence (17%) and outcomes when spread occurred (16%). Those who had a SLNB were more likely to report a moderate or high unmet need for help with uncertainty about the future or with lymphoedema (p < 0.05). Overall, 32% of participants had anxiety and 15% had depression regardless of performance of SLNB. Melanoma-specific symptoms were worse in SLNB patients (p = 0.03). Compared with the general population, emotional well-being was lower amongst melanoma patients.

Conclusions: A substantial proportion of newly diagnosed patients with localised invasive melanoma need further melanoma-specific information and support with psychological concerns. Patients who have a SLNB clear of disease may need help with symptoms after surgery.
Keyword Cancer
Oncology
Melanoma
Supportive care needs
Distress
Quality of life
Sentinel lymph node biopsy
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article first published online: 29 OCT 2014

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 3 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 3 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Thu, 19 Mar 2015, 02:42:55 EST by Kylie Hengst on behalf of UQ Diamantina Institute