There is no leadership if no one follows: Why leadership is necessarily a group process

Platow, Michael J., Haslam, S. Alexander, Reicher, Stephen D. and Steffens, Niklas K. (2015) There is no leadership if no one follows: Why leadership is necessarily a group process. International Coaching Psychology Review, 10 1: 20-37.

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Author Platow, Michael J.
Haslam, S. Alexander
Reicher, Stephen D.
Steffens, Niklas K.
Title There is no leadership if no one follows: Why leadership is necessarily a group process
Journal name International Coaching Psychology Review   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1750-2764
Publication date 2015-03-01
Year available 2015
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Volume 10
Issue 1
Start page 20
End page 37
Total pages 18
Place of publication Leicester, United Kingdom
Publisher The British Psychological Society
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
In this paper, we put forward the thesis that leadership is fundamentally a group process: leaders must be ‘one of us’. We build our argument around recent social identity theory and self-categorisation theory analyses of leadership. In doing so, we highlight the essential nature of shared psychological group memberships as the key mediating processes through which leadership develops. Through a review of existing research, we then demonstrate:
(1) how leadership is exerted through in-group-based social influence;
(2) how the more that group members capture the attributes of ‘us-in-context’ – the more they are in-group prototypical – the greater will be their leadership potential; and
(3) how common attributes associated with leadership (i.e. trust, charisma, fairness) can all be understood as outcomes of shared psychological group membership. Leadership, however, is not simply about ‘being’, it is about ‘doing’ as well. In this manner, we discuss the importance of acting to advance the group (in the form of social identity advancement) and crafting a sense of the group (in the form of social identity entrepreneurship). We conclude by reviewing a recently-developed Identity Leadership Inventory that allows practitioners to take these ideas from concepts to practice
Keyword Leadership
Social Identity
Group membership
Social Influence
Ingroup Prototypicality
Social Identity Advancement
Social Identity Entrepreneurship
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 17 Mar 2015, 19:51:34 EST by Niklas Steffens on behalf of School of Psychology