Distinct roles of the intraparietal sulcus and temporoparietal junction in attentional capture from distractor features: an individual differences approach

Painter, David R., Dux, Paul E. and Mattingley, Jason B. (2015) Distinct roles of the intraparietal sulcus and temporoparietal junction in attentional capture from distractor features: an individual differences approach. Neuropsychologia, 74 50-62. doi:10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2015.02.029


Author Painter, David R.
Dux, Paul E.
Mattingley, Jason B.
Title Distinct roles of the intraparietal sulcus and temporoparietal junction in attentional capture from distractor features: an individual differences approach
Journal name Neuropsychologia   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1873-3514
0028-3932
Publication date 2015-02-24
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2015.02.029
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 74
Start page 50
End page 62
Total pages 13
Place of publication Kidlington, Oxford United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon Press
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Setting attention for an elementary visual feature, such as color or motion, results in greater spatial attentional “capture” from items with target compared with distractor features. Thus, capture is contingent on feature-based control settings. Neuroimaging studies suggest that this contingent attentional capture involves interactions between dorsal and ventral frontoparietal networks. To examine the distinct causal influences of these networks on contingent capture, we applied continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS) to alter neural excitability within the dorsal intraparietal sulcus (IPS), the ventral temporoparietal junction (TPJ) and a control site, visual area MT. Participants undertook an attentional capture task before and after stimulation, in which they made speeded responses to color-defined targets that were preceded by spatial cues in the target or distractor color. Cues appeared either at the target location (valid) or at a non-target location (invalid). Reaction times were slower for targets preceded by invalid compared with valid cues, demonstrating spatial attentional capture. Cues with the target color captured attention to a greater extent than those with the distractor color, consistent with contingent capture. Effects of cTBS were not evident at the group level, but emerged instead from analyses of individual differences. Target capture magnitude was positively correlated pre- and post-stimulation for all three cortical sites, suggesting that cTBS did not influence target capture. Conversely, distractor capture was positively correlated pre- and post-stimulation of MT, but uncorrelated for IPS and TPJ, suggesting that stimulation of IPS and TPJ selectively disrupted distractor capture. Additionally, the effects of IPS stimulation were predicted by pre-stimulation attentional capture, whereas the effects of TPJ stimulation were predicted by pre-stimulation distractor suppression. The results are consistent with the existence of distinct neural circuits underlying target and distractor capture, as well as distinct roles for the IPS and TPJ.
Keyword Enhancement
Feature-based attention
Spatial attention
Suppression
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Queensland Brain Institute Publications
Official 2016 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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