Trait compensation and sex-specific aging of performance in male and female professional basketball players

Lailvaux, Simon P., Wilson, Robbie and Kasumovic, Michael M. (2014) Trait compensation and sex-specific aging of performance in male and female professional basketball players. Evolution, 68 5: 1523-1532. doi:10.1111/evo.12375


Author Lailvaux, Simon P.
Wilson, Robbie
Kasumovic, Michael M.
Title Trait compensation and sex-specific aging of performance in male and female professional basketball players
Journal name Evolution   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1558-5646
0014-3820
Publication date 2014-05-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/evo.12375
Volume 68
Issue 5
Start page 1523
End page 1532
Total pages 10
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Abstract Phenotypic traits are often influenced by dynamic resource allocation trade-offs which, when occurring over the course of individual lifespan, may manifest as trait aging. Although aging is studied for a variety of traits that are closely tied to reproduction or reproductive effort, the aging of multiple traits related to fitness in other ways are less well understood. We took advantage of almost 30 years of data on human whole-organism performance in the National Basketball Association (USA) to examine trends of aging in performance traits associated with scoring. Given that patterns of aging differ between sexes in other animal species, we also analyzed a smaller dataset on players in the Women's National Basketball Association to test for potential sex differences in the aging of comparable traits. We tested the hypothesis that age-related changes in a specific aspect of overall performance can be compensated for by elevated expression of another, related aspect. Our analyses suggest that the aging of performance traits used in basketball is generally characterized by senescence in males, whereas age-related changes in basketball performance are less evident in females. Our data also indicate a different rate of senescence of different performance traits associated with scoring over a male's lifetime.
Keyword Compensation
Life history
Sex differences
Trade-offs
Whole-organism performance
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Sat, 14 Mar 2015, 03:10:57 EST by Gail Walter on behalf of School of Biological Sciences