The relationship between approach to activity engagement, specific aspects of physical function, and pain duration in chronic pain

Andrews, Nicole E., Strong, Jenny and Meredith, Pamela J. (2015) The relationship between approach to activity engagement, specific aspects of physical function, and pain duration in chronic pain. The Clinical Journal of Pain, 32 1: 20-31. doi:10.1097/AJP.0000000000000226

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Author Andrews, Nicole E.
Strong, Jenny
Meredith, Pamela J.
Title The relationship between approach to activity engagement, specific aspects of physical function, and pain duration in chronic pain
Journal name The Clinical Journal of Pain   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0749-8047
1536-5409
Publication date 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1097/AJP.0000000000000226
Volume 32
Issue 1
Start page 20
End page 31
Total pages 47
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA, United States
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objectives: To examine: 1) the relationships between habitual approach to activity engagement and specific aspects of physical functioning in chronic pain, and 2) whether or not these relationships differ according to pain duration.

Materials and Methods
: Outpatients (N=169) with generalised chronic pain completed a set of written questionnaires. Categories of approach to activity engagement‘ were created using the confronting and avoidance subscales of the Pain and Activity Relations Questionnaire (PARQ). An interaction term between approach to activity engagement‘ categories and pain duration was entered into analysis with age, gender, pain intensity, the categorical approach to activity engagement‘ variable, and pain duration, in nine ordinal regression models investigating functioning in a variety of daily activities.

Results: The approach to activity engagement‘ category predicted the personal care, lifting, sleeping, social life, and travelling aspects of physical functioning but, interestingly, not the performance skills used during these activities, i.e., walking, sitting and standing. The interaction term was significant in two models; however, the effect of pain duration on associations was the inverse of that theorised, with the relationship between variables becoming less pronounced with increasing duration of pain.

Discussion: The results of this study do not support the commonly held notion that avoidance and/or overactivity behaviour leads to deconditioning and reduced physical capacity over time. Findings do, however, suggest that a relationship exists between avoidance and/or overactivity behaviour and reduced participation in activities.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 13 Mar 2015, 16:12:33 EST by Professor Jenny Strong on behalf of School of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences