Attitudes of Australian and Turkish students of veterinary medicine toward nonhuman animals and their careers

Izmirli, Serdar, Yigit, Ali and Phillips, Clive Julian Christie (2014) Attitudes of Australian and Turkish students of veterinary medicine toward nonhuman animals and their careers. Society & Animals, 22 6: 580-601. doi:10.1163/15685306-12341352


Author Izmirli, Serdar
Yigit, Ali
Phillips, Clive Julian Christie
Title Attitudes of Australian and Turkish students of veterinary medicine toward nonhuman animals and their careers
Journal name Society & Animals   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1063-1119
1568-5306
Publication date 2014
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1163/15685306-12341352
Open Access Status
Volume 22
Issue 6
Start page 580
End page 601
Total pages 22
Place of publication Leiden, Netherlands
Publisher Brill
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Abstract We examined attitudes toward nonhuman animal welfare and rights and career aspirations in Australian and Turkish veterinary students. A representative university was selected in each country, with 190 first- and third-year students sampled in each. Survey questions addressed attitudes toward nonhuman animal welfare/rights, and intended career. Australian and Turkish students were predominately female and male, respectively, but attitudes were similar between sexes. Australian students rated keeping companion animals and hormonal desexing more acceptable, and food and rest deprivation, pain during slaughter, and using animals in experiments less acceptable than Turkish students. Keeping companion animals related strongly with students’ moral values, their decision to study veterinary medicine, and program satisfaction. More Australian than Turkish students wanted to enter clinical practice. Thus veterinary students of these two culturally contrasting countries demonstrated both differences and universalities, such as companion animal keeping, which influenced their attitudes toward animals and career aspirations.
Keyword Animal welfare
Attitudes
Australia
Turkey
Veterinary education
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Veterinary Science Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 4 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Tue, 10 Mar 2015, 13:29:21 EST by Annette Winter on behalf of School of Veterinary Science