Global disparity in the ecological benefits of reducing carbon emissions for coral reefs

Ortiz, Juan Carlos, Bozec, Yves-Marie, Wolff, Nicholas H., Doropoulos, Christopher and Mumby, Peter J. (2014) Global disparity in the ecological benefits of reducing carbon emissions for coral reefs. Nature Climate Change, 4 12: 1090-1094. doi:10.1038/NCLIMATE2439


Author Ortiz, Juan Carlos
Bozec, Yves-Marie
Wolff, Nicholas H.
Doropoulos, Christopher
Mumby, Peter J.
Title Global disparity in the ecological benefits of reducing carbon emissions for coral reefs
Journal name Nature Climate Change   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1758-678X
1758-6798
Publication date 2014-12-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1038/NCLIMATE2439
Volume 4
Issue 12
Start page 1090
End page 1094
Total pages 5
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Abstract Even if carbon emissions are reduced drastically in the next decade the amount of carbon already stored in the atmosphere would lead to the occurrence of extreme thermal events every three to four years between 2040 and 2080. This time lag on the effect of reducing emissions suggests that the benefits of carbon emission reduction on the health of coral reefs will be noticeable only in the long term. Here, we use a spatially explicit ecosystem model to compare the potential ecosystem benefits that Caribbean and Pacific reefs could gain from reductions in carbon emissions, and the timescale of these benefits. We found that whereas the effect of a reduction in emissions on Caribbean reefs will be modest and realized only in the long term (more than 60 years), Pacific reefs would start to show benefits within the first half of this century. Moreover, it seems that Pacific reefs have the potential to maintain their ecological integrity and ecosystem state in the mid- to long term if carbon emissions are reduced, but only if plate-like corals are present.
Keyword Great Barrier Reef
Climate change
Ocean acidification
Resilience
Dynamics
Acropora
Impact
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 10 Mar 2015, 01:22:43 EST by Gail Walter on behalf of School of Biological Sciences