The biology of an isolated population of the American Flamingo Phoenicopterus ruber in the Galapagos Islands

Tindle, Robert W., Tupiza, Arnaldo, Blomberg, Simon P. and Tindle, L. Elizabeth (2014) The biology of an isolated population of the American Flamingo Phoenicopterus ruber in the Galapagos Islands. Galapagos Research, 68 .

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Author Tindle, Robert W.
Tupiza, Arnaldo
Blomberg, Simon P.
Tindle, L. Elizabeth
Title The biology of an isolated population of the American Flamingo Phoenicopterus ruber in the Galapagos Islands
Formatted title
The biology of an isolated population of the American Flamingo Phoenicopterus ruber in the Galapagos Islands
Journal name Galapagos Research
ISSN 1390-2830
Publication date 2014-12-15
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 68
Total pages 13
Place of publication Puerto Ayora, Galapagos, Ecuador
Publisher Charles Darwin Foundation
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Abstract A genetically and morphologically divergent population of c. 500 American Flamingos, isolated from the parental Caribbean stock of Phoenicopterus ruber, occurs in the Galapagos archipelago. Based primarily on data from a 3-year study, we provide the first description of the feeding and breeding biology of this population. Galapagos provides a suitable habitat comprising lagoons on a number of islands, among which the flamingos travel in response to food and nest site availability. We identify putative food items. The occurrence and quantity of some food species was associated with the chlorosity of lagoon water, as was the distribution of flamingos. The flamingos bred opportunistically at five lagoons on four islands, sometimes simultaneously on more than one island. Group display usually involved ≤ 20 birds, and colonies contained as few as three nests. Laying occurred during nine months of the year, mainly August– January, coinciding with the coastal drier season and low lagoon water levels. On average c. 30 % of all adults incubated clutches each year, producing 0.37 fledglings per clutch. Recruitment is probably sufficient to sustain the population, which has been stable over at least c. 45 years, and is probably limited by suitable habitat. Moult to flightlessness was recorded among adults. We review potential dangers to this unique population and suggest conservation measures.
Keyword American flamingo
Galapagos
Phoenicopterus ruber
Breeding
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online 15 December 2014

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Faculty of Science Publications
Official 2015 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 09 Mar 2015, 21:29:17 EST by Simon Blomberg on behalf of School of Biological Sciences