Beyond the hospital door: a retrospective, cohort study of associations between birthing in the public or private sector and women's postpartum care

Brodribb, Wendy, Zadoroznyj, Maria, Nesic, Michelle, Kruske, Sue and Miller, Yvette D. (2015) Beyond the hospital door: a retrospective, cohort study of associations between birthing in the public or private sector and women's postpartum care. BMC Health Services Research, 15 1: 1-11. doi:10.1186/s12913-015-0689-3


Author Brodribb, Wendy
Zadoroznyj, Maria
Nesic, Michelle
Kruske, Sue
Miller, Yvette D.
Title Beyond the hospital door: a retrospective, cohort study of associations between birthing in the public or private sector and women's postpartum care
Journal name BMC Health Services Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1472-6963
Publication date 2015-01
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1186/s12913-015-0689-3
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 15
Issue 1
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Place of publication London United Kingdom
Publisher BioMed Central
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background

In Australia, maternity care is available through universal coverage and a parallel, competitive private health insurance system. Differences between sectors in antenatal and intrapartum care and associated outcomes are well documented but few studies have investigated differences in postpartum care following hospital discharge and their impact on maternal satisfaction and confidence.

Methods

Women who birthed in Queensland, Australia from February to May 2010 were mailed a self-report survey 4 months postpartum. Regression analysis was used to determine associations between sector of birth and postpartum care, and whether postpartum care experiences explained sector differences in postpartum well-being (satisfaction, parenting confidence and feeling depressed).

Results

Women who birthed in the public sector had higher odds of health professional contact in the first 10 days post-discharge and satisfaction with the amount of postpartum care. After adjusting for demographic and postpartum contact variables, sector of birth no longer had an impact on satisfaction (AOR 0.95, 99% CI 0.78-1.31), but any form of health professional contact did. Women who had a care provider’s 24 hour contact details had higher odds of being satisfied (AOR 3.64, 95% CI 3.00-4.42) and confident (AOR 1.34, 95% CI 1.08- 1.65).

Conclusion

Women who birthed in the public sector appeared more satisfied because they had higher odds of receiving contact from a health professional within 10 days post-discharge. All women should have an opportunity to speak to and/or see a doctor, midwife or nurse in the first 10 days at home, and the details of a person they can contact 24 hours a day.
Keyword Postnatal
Community
Maternal satisfaction
Health insurance
Parenting confidence
Postnatal depression
Follow up visits
Randomized controlled trial
Health insurance
Postnatal care
Australia
Discharge
Impact
Rates
Home
Intervention
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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