Survey of Australian Oral Health Practitioners and their Smoking Cessation Practices

Ford, P., Tran, P., Keen, B. and Gartner, C. (2015) Survey of Australian Oral Health Practitioners and their Smoking Cessation Practices. Australian Dental Journal, 60 1: 43-51. doi:10.1111/adj.12270

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Author Ford, P.
Tran, P.
Keen, B.
Gartner, C.
Title Survey of Australian Oral Health Practitioners and their Smoking Cessation Practices
Journal name Australian Dental Journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0045-0421
1834-7819
Publication date 2015-02-26
Year available 2015
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1111/adj.12270
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 60
Issue 1
Start page 43
End page 51
Total pages 9
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: Smoking is a significant health and economic burden in Australia. Studies of smoking cessation practices in dental settings have primarily concentrated on dentists rather than other oral health practitioner (OHP) groups (dental hygienists, dental therapists and oral health therapists). The aim of this study was to measure Australian OHPs’ attitudes, behaviours, interest and barriers to delivering smoking cessation interventions.

Methods: Members of the two peak professional bodies representing Australian OHPs were invited to participate in an anonymous online questionnaire.

Results: There were discrepancies between practitioner attitudes and current smoking cessation practices. While the majority of practitioners (90.1%) frequently screened for smoking behaviour, fewer (51.1%) assisted patients to quit smoking. The principal form of assistance was referral to Quitline (45.7%) or to a general medical practitioner (44.4%). The most prevalent barriers identified were lack of knowledge of pharmacological treatments (45.8%) and lack of access to smoking cessation resources (44.2%). Contrary to international studies, time and financial incentive were not commonly cited barriers to delivering smoking cessation interventions.

Conclusions: This survey identifies a need for continuing education in smoking cessation practice. Dissemination of policies, guidelines and resources may assist OHPs to become more engaged and confident in delivering smoking cessation interventions as part of their routine practice.
Keyword Dental hygienists
Dental setting
Oral health therapists
Smoking Cessation
Tobacco
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: UQ Centre for Clinical Research Publications
Official 2016 Collection
School of Dentistry Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 06 Mar 2015, 21:03:40 EST by Coral Gartner on behalf of School of Dentistry