Cooperative learning: the behavioural and neurological markers that help to explain its success

Gillies, Robyn and Cunnington, Ross (2014). Cooperative learning: the behavioural and neurological markers that help to explain its success. In: Quality and Equity: What does research tell us?. ACER Research Conference 2014, Adelaide, Australia, (38-43). 3-5 August 2014.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Gillies, Robyn
Cunnington, Ross
Title of paper Cooperative learning: the behavioural and neurological markers that help to explain its success
Conference name ACER Research Conference 2014
Conference location Adelaide, Australia
Conference dates 3-5 August 2014
Convener Geoff Masters
Proceedings title Quality and Equity: What does research tell us?
Place of Publication Camberwell, VIC, Australia
Publisher Australian Council for Educational Research
Publication Year 2014
Sub-type Fully published paper
Open Access Status
ISBN 9781742862491
Start page 38
End page 43
Total pages 6
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Cooperative learning is widely recognised as a pedagogical practice that promotes socialisation and learning among students from preschool to post-secondary education and across different key learning areas and subject domains. It involves students working together in small groups to achieve common goals or complete group tasks. Interest in cooperative learning has grown rapidly over the last three decades, as research clearly demonstrates how it can be used to promote a range of achievements in reading and writing, conceptual understanding and problem-solving in science and mathematics, and higher level thinking and reasoning. It has also been shown to promote interpersonal relationships among students with diverse learning and adjustments needs and among those from culturally and ethnically different backgrounds. In fact, it is argued that there is no other pedagogical practice that achieves such outcomes. The purpose of this presentation is to highlight those factors that have been found to contribute to the success of cooperative learning, including recent research in neuroscience that helps to explain how and why students learn when they cooperate.
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Thu, 05 Mar 2015, 09:59:22 EST by Ms Kathleen Mcleod on behalf of School of Education