Interaction between pain, movement, and physical activity: short-term benefits, long-term consequences, and targets for treatment

Hodges, Paul W. and Smeets, Rob J. (2015) Interaction between pain, movement, and physical activity: short-term benefits, long-term consequences, and targets for treatment. Clinical Journal of Pain, 31 2: 97-107. doi:10.1097/AJP.0000000000000098


Author Hodges, Paul W.
Smeets, Rob J.
Title Interaction between pain, movement, and physical activity: short-term benefits, long-term consequences, and targets for treatment
Journal name Clinical Journal of Pain   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1536-5409
0749-8047
Publication date 2015-02-21
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1097/AJP.0000000000000098
Open Access Status
Volume 31
Issue 2
Start page 97
End page 107
Total pages 11
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA United States
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Abstract Movement is changed in pain. This presents across a spectrum from subtle changes in the manner in which a task is completed to complete avoidance of a function and could be both a cause and effect of pain/nociceptive input and/or injury. Movement, in a variety of forms, is also recommended as a component of treatment to aid the recovery in many pain syndromes. Some argue it may not be sufficient to simply increase activity, whereas others defend a necessity to consider how a person moves. There is unlikely to be a simple relationship between pain and movement, as both too little and too much movement could be suboptimal for the health of the tissues. The interaction between pain, (re)injury, and movement is surprisingly unclear. Traditional theories to explain adaptation in the motor system in pain are unable to account for the variability observed in laboratory and clinical practice. New theories are required. Treatments that focus on physical activity and exercise are the cornerstone of management of many pain conditions, but the effect sizes are modest. There is limited consensus when, if, and how interventions may be individualized and combined. The aim of this narrative review was to present current understanding of the interaction between movement and pain; as a cause or effect of pain, and in terms of the role of movement (physical activity and exercise) in recovery of pain and restoration of function.
Keyword Adaptation
Motor control
Movement
Pain
Physical activity
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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