How much do range of movement and coordination affect Paralympic sprint performance?

Connick, Mark. J., Beckman, Emma, Spathis, Jemima, Deuble, Rebecca and Tweedy, Sean M. (2015) How much do range of movement and coordination affect Paralympic sprint performance?. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 47 10: 2216-2223. doi:10.1249/MSS.0000000000000643

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Author Connick, Mark. J.
Beckman, Emma
Spathis, Jemima
Deuble, Rebecca
Tweedy, Sean M.
Title How much do range of movement and coordination affect Paralympic sprint performance?
Journal name Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0195-9131
1530-0315
Publication date 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1249/MSS.0000000000000643
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 47
Issue 10
Start page 2216
End page 2223
Total pages 28
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA, USA
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Introduction:
Development of evidence-based methods of Paralympic classification requires research quantifying the relative strength of association between ratio-scaled measures of impairment and sports performance. To date, no such research has been conducted. The purpose of this study was to quantify the extent to which range of movement (ROM) and coordination
affect running performance in runners with and without brain impairment.
Methods:
Participants were 41 male runners, 13 with brain impairments (RBI) and 28 non-disabled (NDR). All participants completed a maximal 60metre sprint as well as a novel battery of 5 lower limb ROM tests and 3 lower limb coordination tests.
Results:
In the coordination tests, RBI showed significantly slower mean movement times compared to NDR on all measures (e.g. 0.54s±0.12 vs. 0.34s±0.05). RBI had significantly lower range of movement on five of ten measures (e.g. 25.9° ±5.4 vs. 37.0° ±6.0) and had significantly slower acceleration (0-15m) (3.2s±0.3 vs. 2.8s±0.2) and top speed (30-60 m) (4.3s±0.6 vs. 3.8s±0.3). Five ROM measures significantly correlated with sprint performance in RBI and did not significantly correlate with sprint performance in NDR satisfying convergent and divergent validity criteria. These individual tests explained 38% to 58% of the variance in sprint performance in RBI.
Conclusion:
This is the first study to quantify the extent to which eligible impairments impact on performance in a Paralympic sport. Five of the ROM measures significantly affected sprint performance in RBI and were deemed valid for the purposes of classifying impairments in classes T35-T38. This study is an important methodological step towards development of evidence-based methods of classifying impairments in classes T35-T38 and provides practical methodological guidance to researchers in this field.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 27 Feb 2015, 16:09:57 EST by Dr Mark Connick on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences