Detecting the effects of water regime on wetland plant communities: which plant indicator groups perform best?

Johns, C. V., Brownstein, G., Fletcher, A., Blick, R. A. J. and Erskine, P. D. (2015) Detecting the effects of water regime on wetland plant communities: which plant indicator groups perform best?. Aquatic Botany, 123 54-63. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aquabot.2015.02.002

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Author Johns, C. V.
Brownstein, G.
Fletcher, A.
Blick, R. A. J.
Erskine, P. D.
Title Detecting the effects of water regime on wetland plant communities: which plant indicator groups perform best?
Journal name Aquatic Botany   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0304-3770
Publication date 2015-05
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aquabot.2015.02.002
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 123
Start page 54
End page 63
Total pages 10
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Water regime is a primary driver of patterns in wetland vegetation composition. Differences in composition can be used as indicators of differences in water regime. We used vegetation point intercept data collected from 51 wetland monitoring plots in the Blue Mountains, south-eastern Australia, to determine which of three indicator group classifications, growth forms, water plant functional groups (WPFGs) or wetland indicator categories (WICs), demonstrated the most consistent differences between vegetation communities from plot sample groups differing in location (wetland edge or core) and surface water availability (typically inundated or damp). PERMANOVA tests showed significant differences between core and edge plot communities analysed by growth form or WIC relative frequencies, but only when tree canopy data (higher in edge plots, which were abutting woodland) was included. Significant differences in communities (PERMANOVA, p ≤ 0.02) were detected between inundation categories for all classification methods when tree data were included, but not for WIC data when tree data were excluded. Overall, ordination plots and ANOSIM R values showed the most consistent community-level differences (least overlap in sample groups) between inundation categories when data were classified by WPFGs, followed by growth forms. ANOVA tests on individual indicator group relative frequencies showed that WPFG classification provided the most indicator groups differing significantly in relative frequency between inundation categories, with these groups also collectively comprising a much higher proportion of the total vegetation recorded per plot than the growth forms or WICs that differed between categories.
Keyword Macrophytes
Hydrology
Monitoring
Indicators
Functional groups
Wetlands
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Centre for Mined Land Rehabilitation Publications
Official 2016 Collection
 
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Created: Mon, 23 Feb 2015, 15:58:21 EST by Caitlin Johns on behalf of Centre For Mined Land Rehabilitation