Fundamental movement skills training to promote physical activity in children with and without disability: a pilot study

Capio, Catherine M., Sit, Cindy H. P., Eguia, Kathlynne F., Abernethy, Bruce and Masters, Richard S. W. (2015) Fundamental movement skills training to promote physical activity in children with and without disability: a pilot study. Journal of Sport and Health Science, 4 3: 235-243. doi:10.1016/j.jshs.2014.08.001

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Author Capio, Catherine M.
Sit, Cindy H. P.
Eguia, Kathlynne F.
Abernethy, Bruce
Masters, Richard S. W.
Title Fundamental movement skills training to promote physical activity in children with and without disability: a pilot study
Journal name Journal of Sport and Health Science   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2095-2546
2213-2961
Publication date 2015
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jshs.2014.08.001
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 4
Issue 3
Start page 235
End page 243
Total pages 9
Place of publication Shanghai, China
Publisher Shanghai Tiyu Xueyuan / Shanghai University of Sport [Elsevier]
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: A positive association between fundamental movement skills (FMS) and physical activity (PA) has been shown in previous research of children with and without disability. This pilot study explored a causal mechanism for such relationship, and hypothesized that when FMS proficiency is improved, enhanced PA uptake will be found in children with and without disability. It was further hypothesized that improving FMS proficiency will have a greater impact on children with disability than those without disability.

Methods: Participants include typically developing (TD) children without disability and children with cerebral palsy (CP), who were allocated to FMS training groups (CP-FMS n = 12, TD-FMS n = 13) and control groups (CP-C n = 12, TD-C n = 13). Training groups practiced five FMS (run, jump, kick, throw, catch) in weekly 45-min sessions for 4 weeks. Control groups had their regular physiotherapy (CP) or physical education (TD) sessions. FMS were evaluated using process- and product-oriented measures, and PA was measured using accelerometers, before and after training.

Results: It was verified that training groups gained improvements in FMS while control groups did not. No significant changes in weekday PA were found. Increased weekend moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was found in the CP-FMS group, while decreased weekend sedentary time was found in the CP-FMS and TD-FMS groups. The percentages of participants who exceeded the minimum detectable change (MDC90) in MVPA and sedentary time were larger in children with CP than in children without disability.

Conclusion: The findings suggest that improved FMS proficiency could potentially contribute to heightened PA and decreased sedentary time during weekends for children. Such effect of improved FMS proficiency on PA appears to be greater in those with physical disability than in those without disability. It is recommended that the findings of this pilot study should be further examined in future research.
Keyword Cerebral palsy
Fundamental movement skills
Motor learning
Physical activity
Sedentary behavior
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Available online 28 August 2014.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 17 Feb 2015, 16:30:36 EST by Sandrine Ducrot on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences