Reconfiguring indigeneity in the mainland Gulf country: mimicry, mimesis and the colonial exchange of difference

Martin, Richard J. (2015) Reconfiguring indigeneity in the mainland Gulf country: mimicry, mimesis and the colonial exchange of difference. The Australian Journal of Anthropology, 26 1: 55-73. doi:10.1111/taja.12124


Author Martin, Richard J.
Title Reconfiguring indigeneity in the mainland Gulf country: mimicry, mimesis and the colonial exchange of difference
Journal name The Australian Journal of Anthropology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1757-6547
1035-8811
Publication date 2015-04
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/taja.12124
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 26
Issue 1
Start page 55
End page 73
Total pages 19
Place of publication Richmond, VIC, Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Abstract This paper explores the meaning of indigeneity in the southern Gulf country by focusing upon a group of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people who claim as a common ancestor a pioneering non-Aboriginal pastoralist. This early settler established a large cattle property on the Northern Territory/Queensland border at the end of the nineteenth century, where he participating in frontier violence as well as attempts to resolve such violence and promote more peaceable relations through various kinds of exchange, including the common-law marriage of his part-Aboriginal son to the daughter of a local Aboriginal leader. Drawing on Taussig's reflections on the economy of mimesis and alterity in colonial exchange, I analyse the ways in which different kinds of connections to the property in question have been phrased by Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal descendants of this man, as well as other local people, from first settlement in the 1860s through to the contemporary moment, when multiple and overlapping assertions of indigenous belonging by Aboriginal people intersect with articulations of an emergent autochthony amongst non-Aboriginal Australians with long histories of residence in the area.
Keyword Indigeneity
Mimicry
Mimesis
Gift exchange
Belonging
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Social Science Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 17 Feb 2015, 12:49:40 EST by Richard Martin on behalf of School of Social Science