Reducing the number of rigid bronchoscopies performed in suspected foreign body aspiration cases via the use of chest computed tomography: is it safe? A literature review

Tuckett, P. and Cervin, A. (2015) Reducing the number of rigid bronchoscopies performed in suspected foreign body aspiration cases via the use of chest computed tomography: is it safe? A literature review. Journal of Laryngology and Otology, 129 S1-S7. doi:10.1017/S0022215114002862


Author Tuckett, P.
Cervin, A.
Title Reducing the number of rigid bronchoscopies performed in suspected foreign body aspiration cases via the use of chest computed tomography: is it safe? A literature review
Journal name Journal of Laryngology and Otology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1748-5460
0022-2151
Publication date 2015-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1017/S0022215114002862
Open Access Status
Volume 129
Start page S1
End page S7
Total pages 7
Place of publication Cambridge, United Kingdom
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: Foreign body aspiration is common and potentially life threatening. Although rigid bronchoscopy has the potential for serious complications, it is the ‘gold standard’ of diagnosis. It is used frequently in light of the inaccuracy of clinical examination and chest radiography. Computed tomography is proposed as a non-invasive alternative to rigid bronchoscopy.

Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy and safety of computed tomography used in the diagnosis of suspected foreign body aspiration, and compare this with the current gold standard, in order to examine the possibility of using computed tomography to reduce the number of diagnostic rigid bronchoscopies performed.

Method: The study comprised a review of literature published from 1970 to 2013, using the PubMed, Scopus, Web of Knowledge, Embase and Medline electronic databases.

Results: The sensitivity for computed tomography ranged between 90 and 100 per cent, with four studies demonstrating 100 per cent sensitivity. Specificity was between 75 and 100 per cent. Radiation exposure doses averaged 2.16 mSv.

Conclusion: Computed tomography is a sensitive and specific modality in the diagnosis of foreign body aspiration, and its future use will reduce the number of unnecessary rigid bronchoscopies.
Keyword Foreign Bodies
Diagnosis
Radiography
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Methods
Airway Obstruction
Bronchoscopy
Radiation Dosage
Sensitivity And Specificity
Bronchi
Inhalation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online ahead of print 17 Nov 2014

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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