Respiratory syncytial virus seasonality in tropical Australia

Paynter, Stuart, Ware, Robert S., Sly, Peter D., Weinstein, Philip and Williams, Gail (2015) Respiratory syncytial virus seasonality in tropical Australia. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 39 1: 8-10. doi:10.1111/1753-6405.12347


Author Paynter, Stuart
Ware, Robert S.
Sly, Peter D.
Weinstein, Philip
Williams, Gail
Title Respiratory syncytial virus seasonality in tropical Australia
Journal name Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1326-0200
1753-6405
Publication date 2015-02-01
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12347
Volume 39
Issue 1
Start page 8
End page 10
Total pages 3
Place of publication Richmond, VIC Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is most common during the rainy season in a number of low- to middle-income tropical settings, a pattern driven by seasonal changes in climate and nutrition. We investigated the seasonality of RSV in the high-income tropical setting of North Queensland, Australia.

Methods: We used RSV hospital admissions data from Cairns and Townsville to assess the seasonality of RSV. We examined the seasonal scale associations between selected meteorological exposures and RSV admissions using cross-correlation of weekly data.

Results: In both Cairns and Townsville, RSV admissions were highest in the latter half of the rainy season. In Cairns, RSV admissions were most strongly correlated with rainfall four weeks previously. In Townsville, RSV admissions were most strongly correlated with rainfall six weeks previously.

Conclusions: The seasonality of RSV in the tropical setting of North Queensland appears to be driven by seasonal variations in rainfall. Further research is needed to assess the impact of climate on RSV incidence in the tropics.
Keyword Climate
Respiratory syncytial virus
Seasonality
Tropical health
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Non HERDC
School of Public Health Publications
School of Medicine Publications
Child Health Research Centre Publications
 
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