Parasites as valuable stock markers for fisheries in Australasia, East Asia and the Pacific Islands

Lester, R. J. G. and Moore, B. R. (2015) Parasites as valuable stock markers for fisheries in Australasia, East Asia and the Pacific Islands. Parasitology, 142 1: 36-53. doi:10.1017/S003118201400016X


Author Lester, R. J. G.
Moore, B. R.
Title Parasites as valuable stock markers for fisheries in Australasia, East Asia and the Pacific Islands
Journal name Parasitology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1469-8161
0031-1820
Publication date 2015-01-02
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1017/S003118201400016X
Volume 142
Issue 1
Start page 36
End page 53
Total pages 18
Place of publication Cambridge, United Kingdom
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Abstract Over 30 studies in Australasia, East Asia and the Pacific Islands region have collected and analysed parasite data to determine the ranges of individual fish, many leading to conclusions about stock delineation. Parasites used as biological tags have included both those known to have long residence times in the fish and those thought to be relatively transient. In many cases the parasitological conclusions have been supported by other methods especially analysis of the chemical constituents of otoliths, and to a lesser extent, genetic data. In analysing parasite data, authors have applied multiple different statistical methodologies, including summary statistics, and univariate and multivariate approaches. Recently, a growing number of researchers have found non-parametric methods, such as analysis of similarities and cluster analysis, to be valuable. Future studies into the residence times, life cycles and geographical distributions of parasites together with more robust analytical methods will yield much important information to clarify stock structures in the area.
Keyword Analysis of similarities
Anisakid
Australasia
Biological tags
Didymozoid
East Asia
Fish
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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