Associations between early shared music activities in the home andlater child outcomes: findings from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children

Williams, Kate E., Barrett, Margaret S., Welch, Graham F., Abad, Vicky and Broughton, Mary (2015) Associations between early shared music activities in the home andlater child outcomes: findings from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children. Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 31 2: 113-124. doi:10.1016/j.ecresq.2015.01.004

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Author Williams, Kate E.
Barrett, Margaret S.
Welch, Graham F.
Abad, Vicky
Broughton, Mary
Title Associations between early shared music activities in the home andlater child outcomes: findings from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children
Journal name Early Childhood Research Quarterly   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0885-2006
1873-7706
Publication date 2015
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.ecresq.2015.01.004
Open Access Status
Volume 31
Issue 2
Start page 113
End page 124
Total pages 12
Place of publication Kidlington, Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon Press
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The benefits of early shared book reading between parents and children have long been established, yet the same cannot be said for early shared music activities in the home. This study investigated the parent–child home music activities in a sample of 3031 Australian children participating in Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC) study. Frequency of shared home music activities was reported by parents when children were 2–3 years and a range of social, emotional, and cognitive outcomes were measured by parent and teacher report and direct testing two years later when children were 4–5 years old. A series of regression analyses (controlling for a set of important socio-demographic variables) found frequency of shared home music activities to have a small significant partial association with measures of children's vocabulary, numeracy, attentional and emotional regulation, and prosocial skills. We then included both book reading and shared home music activities in the same models and found that frequency of shared home music activities maintained small partial associations with measures of prosocial skills, attentional regulation, and numeracy. Our findings suggest there may be a role for parent-child home music activities in supporting children's development.
Keyword Early childhood
Home learning environment
Home music activities
Shared music-making
Shared book reading
Self-regulation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Music Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 3 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Mon, 16 Feb 2015, 16:25:16 EST by Mary Broughton on behalf of School of Music