How receptor diffusion influences gradient sensing

Nguyen, H., Dayan, P. and Goodhill, G. J. (2015) How receptor diffusion influences gradient sensing. Journal of the Royal Society: Interface, 12 102: 1-8. doi:10.1098/rsif.2014.1097


Author Nguyen, H.
Dayan, P.
Goodhill, G. J.
Title How receptor diffusion influences gradient sensing
Journal name Journal of the Royal Society: Interface   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1742-5662
1742-5689
Publication date 2015-01-06
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1098/rsif.2014.1097
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 12
Issue 102
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher The Royal Society Publishing
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Abstract Chemotaxis, or directed motion in chemical gradients, is critical for various biological processes. Many eukaryotic cells perform spatial sensing, i.e. they detect gradients by comparing spatial differences in binding occupancy of chemosensory receptors across their membrane. In many theoretical models of spatial sensing, it is assumed, for the sake of simplicity, that the receptors concerned do not move. However, in reality, receptors undergo diverse modes of diffusion, and can traverse considerable distances in the time it takes such cells to turn in an external gradient. This sets a physical limit on the accuracy of spatial sensing, which we explore using a model in which receptors diffuse freely over the membrane. We find that the Fisher information carried in binding and unbinding events decreases monotonically with the diffusion constant of the receptors.
Keyword Chemotaxis
Spatial sensing
Receptor diffusion
Fisher information
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online 3 December 2014

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Mathematics and Physics
Queensland Brain Institute Publications
Official 2015 Collection
 
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Created: Mon, 16 Feb 2015, 09:46:43 EST by Susan Day on behalf of Queensland Brain Institute