Higher education as a context for "religion and science". Galileo still goes to jail: conflict model persistence within introductory anthropology materials

Aechtner, Thomas (2015) Higher education as a context for "religion and science". Galileo still goes to jail: conflict model persistence within introductory anthropology materials. Zygon, 50 1: 209-226. doi:10.1111/zygo.12149


Author Aechtner, Thomas
Title Higher education as a context for "religion and science". Galileo still goes to jail: conflict model persistence within introductory anthropology materials
Journal name Zygon   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0591-2385
1467-9744
Publication date 2015-03
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/zygo.12149
Open Access Status
Volume 50
Issue 1
Start page 209
End page 226
Total pages 18
Place of publication Hoboken, NJ, United States
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Historians have long since rejected the dubious assertions of the conflict model, with its narratives of perennial religion versus science combat. Nonetheless, this theory persists in various academic disciplines, and it is still presented to university students as the authoritative historical account of religion–science interactions. Cases of this can be identified within modern anthropology textbooks and reference materials, which often recapitulate claims once made by John W. Draper and Andrew D. White. This article examines 21st-century introductory anthropology publications, demonstrating how such works perpetuate religion–science myths and the notion that history has been replete with inevitable religion versus science warfare. In particular, this study reveals how such introductory materials propagate discord narratives associated with the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment. Affiliated with these anecdotes are oversimplified accounts of religious responses to heliocentrism and evolutionary theory, as well as claims that science has invariably led to the usurpation of religious belief and secularization from Galileo onwards.
Keyword Anthropology
Conflict model
Charles Darwin
Galileo
Pedagogical materials
Reference texts
Social sciences
Textbooks
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Historical and Philosophical Inquiry
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article
Scopus Citation Count Cited 1 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Mon, 16 Feb 2015, 09:07:45 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of School of Historical and Philosophical Inquiry