Doing the right thing at the right time: assessing responses to patient deterioration in electronic simulation scenarios using Course-of-Action Analysis

Cooper, Simon, Cant, Robyn P., Bogossian, Fiona, Bucknall, Tracey and Hopmans, Ruben (2015) Doing the right thing at the right time: assessing responses to patient deterioration in electronic simulation scenarios using Course-of-Action Analysis. Computers, Informatics, Nursing, 33 5: 199-207. doi:10.1097/CIN.0000000000000141


Author Cooper, Simon
Cant, Robyn P.
Bogossian, Fiona
Bucknall, Tracey
Hopmans, Ruben
Title Doing the right thing at the right time: assessing responses to patient deterioration in electronic simulation scenarios using Course-of-Action Analysis
Journal name Computers, Informatics, Nursing   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1538-2931
Publication date 2015-05
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1097/CIN.0000000000000141
Open Access Status
Volume 33
Issue 5
Start page 199
End page 207
Total pages 9
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA, United States
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Abstract International studies indicate that the recognition and management of deteriorating patients in hospitals are poor and that patient assessment is often inadequate. Face-to-face simulation programs have been shown to have an impact on educational and clinical outcomes; however, little is known about performance in contemporary healthcare e-simulation approaches. Using data from an open-access Web-based patient deterioration program (FIRSTACTWeb), the performance of 367 Australian nursing students in identification of treatment priorities and clinical actions was analyzed using a military model of Course of Action Simulation Analysis. Participants' performance in the whole program demonstrated a significant improvement in knowledge and skills (P ≤ .001) with high levels of participant satisfaction. Course of Action Simulation Analysis modeling identified three key participant groupings within which only 18% took the "best course of action" (the right actions and timing), with most (70%) completing the right actions but in the wrong order. The remaining 12% produced incomplete assessments and actions in an incorrect sequence. Contemporary approaches such as e-simulation do enhance educational outcomes. Measurement of performance when combined with Course of Action Simulation Analysis becomes a useful tool in the description of outcomes, an understanding of decision making, and the prediction of future events.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 2 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 2 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Fri, 13 Feb 2015, 08:43:37 EST by Dr Fiona Bogossian on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work