Identifying the periphery: Challenging citizenship, nationality and identity on the Ogasawara Islands

Chapman, David (2012). Identifying the periphery: Challenging citizenship, nationality and identity on the Ogasawara Islands. In Caroline Pluss and Kwok-bun Chan (Ed.), Living Intersections: Transnational Migrant Identifications in Asia (pp. 193-211) Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Springer Science + Business Media. doi:10.1007/978-94-007-2966-7_10


Author Chapman, David
Title of chapter Identifying the periphery: Challenging citizenship, nationality and identity on the Ogasawara Islands
Title of book Living Intersections: Transnational Migrant Identifications in Asia
Place of Publication Dordrecht, The Netherlands
Publisher Springer Science + Business Media
Publication Year 2012
Sub-type Research book chapter (original research)
DOI 10.1007/978-94-007-2966-7_10
Open Access Status
Year available 2012
Series International Perspectives on Migration
ISBN 9789400729667
9400729669
9789400729650
Editor Caroline Pluss
Kwok-bun Chan
Chapter number 10
Start page 193
End page 211
Total pages 9
Total chapters 13
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
The Ogasawara Islands of Japan are a site of multiple layers of migration and displacement. The islands were first settled by Europeans and Pacific Islanders in 1830 and then colonized by Japan in 1875. In 1944, at the height of WWII, the islands’ inhabitants were forced to evacuate to mainland Japan. The US navy then occupied the islands until their return to Japanese sovereignty in 1964. This chapter discusses the identifications of the Ogasawara Islanders. It situates the Ogasawara Islands in their historical context of migration but focuses on the period from the evacuation to the reversion to Japanese sovereignty as an extraordinary period of mobilization. The chapter shows that the displacement of the entire civilian population led to experiences that varied greatly among the diverse islanders. Explaining the numerous and multifaceted dimensions and their intersections of the Ogasawara Islander experiences shows that, like other Islanders, Ogasawara identity is characterized by the tension between on the one hand, isolation and insularity and on the other, mobility and migration. Interviews of Islanders indicate that the processes of identification within the changing cultural, political, and social contexts of the islands have played a significant role in affecting notions of self.
Q-Index Code B1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Book Chapter
Collection: School of Languages and Cultures Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 09 Feb 2015, 16:38:00 EST by Ms Katrina Hume on behalf of School of Languages and Cultures