Trajectories of rice-farming households in mainland South-East Asia

Cramb, Rob (2014). Trajectories of rice-farming households in mainland South-East Asia. In: Lisa Robins, A policy dialogue on rice futures: rice-based farming systems research in the Mekong region. A policy dialogue on rice futures: rice-based farming systems research in the Mekong region, Phnom Penh, Cambodia, (15-24). 7–9 May 2014.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Cramb, Rob
Title of paper Trajectories of rice-farming households in mainland South-East Asia
Conference name A policy dialogue on rice futures: rice-based farming systems research in the Mekong region
Conference location Phnom Penh, Cambodia
Conference dates 7–9 May 2014
Proceedings title A policy dialogue on rice futures: rice-based farming systems research in the Mekong region   Check publisher's open access policy
Series ACIAR Proceedings
Place of Publication Canberra, ACT, Australia
Publisher Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research
Publication Year 2014
Sub-type Fully published paper
Open Access Status
ISBN 9781925133516
9781925133523
ISSN 1038-6920
1447-0837
Editor Lisa Robins
Volume 142
Start page 15
End page 24
Total pages 10
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Abstract/Summary The five countries of mainland South-East Asia (MSEA) are undergoing the major agrarian and demographic transitions associated with rapid economic growth, with significant implications for the livelihood trajectories of rice-farming households in the lowlands. The experience of early-transforming countries, notably Thailand, provides clues to the possible trajectories of late transforming countries such as Laos and Cambodia. The growth in incomes and reduction in poverty has led to a diversification of diets, with rice taking on less significance. The sharp drop in fertility has provided a ‘demographic dividend’ to rural households, reducing the dependency ratio, slowing the growth in the number of households, and slowing the reduction in farm size. Combined with the rise in rural–urban and cross-border wage migration, this demographic trend has created a shortage of farm labour and increased the incentive for adoption of labour-saving innovations, notably mechanisation. Improvements in infrastructure and the growth in demand for a wider range of agricultural products have increased the returns to non-rice crop and livestock activities relative to rice. Although the share of agriculture in the economy (and of the rice sector in particular) will continue to fall, the overwhelming trajectory is not one of agricultural decline but of farm and livelihood diversification—with rice cultivation still an important component—helping to lift many rice-farming households out of poverty.
Keyword Agrarian change
Smallholder farming
Subsistence agriculture
Commercial agriculture
Livelihood diversification
Demographic change
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes http://aciar.gov.au/publication/pr142

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
Official 2015 Collection
 
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Created: Tue, 03 Feb 2015, 16:11:59 EST by Rob Cramb on behalf of School of Agriculture and Food Sciences