Hormone and metabolite profiles in nesting green and flatback turtles: Turtle species with different life histories

Ikonomopoulou, Maria P., Bradley, Adrian J., Ibrahim, Kammarudin, Limpus, Colin J., Fernandez-Rojo, Manuel A., Vagenas, Dimitrios and Whittier, Joan M. (2014) Hormone and metabolite profiles in nesting green and flatback turtles: Turtle species with different life histories. Advances in Zoology, 2014 Article ID 503209: . doi:10.1155/2014/503209

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Author Ikonomopoulou, Maria P.
Bradley, Adrian J.
Ibrahim, Kammarudin
Limpus, Colin J.
Fernandez-Rojo, Manuel A.
Vagenas, Dimitrios
Whittier, Joan M.
Title Hormone and metabolite profiles in nesting green and flatback turtles: Turtle species with different life histories
Journal name Advances in Zoology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2356-6922
2314-7865
Publication date 2014-08-27
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1155/2014/503209
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 2014
Issue Article ID 503209
Total pages 9
Place of publication New York, NY United States
Publisher Hindawi Publishing Corporation
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Herbivorous turtle, Chelonia mydas, inhabiting the south China Sea and breeding in Peninsular Malaysia, and Natator depressus, a carnivorous turtle inhabiting the Great Barrier Reef and breeding at Curtis Island in Queensland, Australia, differ both in diet and life history. Analysis of plasma metabolites levels and six sex steroid hormones during the peak of their nesting season in both species showed hormonal and metabolite variations. When compared with results from other studies progesterone levels were the highest whereas dihydrotestosterone was the plasma steroid hormone present at the lowest concentration in both C. mydas and N. depressus plasma. Interestingly, oestrone was observed at relatively high concentrations in comparison to oestradiol levels recorded in previous studies suggesting that it plays a significant role in nesting turtles. Also, hormonal correlations between the studied species indicate unique physiological interactions during nesting. Pearson correlation analysis showed that in N. depressus the time of oviposition was associated with elevations in both plasma corticosterone and oestrone levels. Therefore, we conclude that corticosterone and oestrone may influence nesting behaviour and physiology in N. depressus. To summarise, these two nesting turtle species can be distinguished based on the hormonal profile of oestrone, progesterone, and testosterone using discriminant analysis
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Biomedical Sciences Publications
Institute for Molecular Bioscience - Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 30 Jan 2015, 10:25:11 EST by Dr Adrian Bradley on behalf of School of Biomedical Sciences