Cross-sector, sessional employment of pharmacists in rural hospitals in Australia and New Zealand: a qualitative study exploring pharmacists' perceptions and experiences

Tan, Amy C. W., Emmerton, Lynne M., Hattingh, Laetitia H. and La Caze, Adam (2014) Cross-sector, sessional employment of pharmacists in rural hospitals in Australia and New Zealand: a qualitative study exploring pharmacists' perceptions and experiences. BMC Health Services Research, 14 1: 567.1-567.10. doi:10.1186/s12913-014-0567-4


Author Tan, Amy C. W.
Emmerton, Lynne M.
Hattingh, Laetitia H.
La Caze, Adam
Title Cross-sector, sessional employment of pharmacists in rural hospitals in Australia and New Zealand: a qualitative study exploring pharmacists' perceptions and experiences
Journal name BMC Health Services Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1472-6963
Publication date 2014
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1186/s12913-014-0567-4
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 14
Issue 1
Start page 567.1
End page 567.10
Total pages 10
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher BioMed Central
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: Many rural hospitals in Australia and New Zealand do not have an on-site pharmacist. Sessional employment of a local pharmacist offers a potential solution to address the clinical service needs of non-pharmacist rural hospitals. This study explored sessional service models involving pharmacists and factors (enablers and challenges) impacting on these models, with a view to informing future sessional employment.

Methods: A series of semi-structured one-on-one interviews was conducted with rural pharmacists with experience, or intention to practise, in a sessional employment role in Australia and New Zealand. Participants were identified via relevant newsletters, discussion forums and referrals from contacts. Interviews were conducted during August 2012-January 2013 via telephone or Skype™, for approximately 40–55 minutes each, and recorded.

Results: Seventeen pharmacists were interviewed: eight with ongoing sessional roles, five with sessional experience, and four working towards sessional employment. Most participants provided sessional hospital services on a weekly basis, mainly focusing on inpatient medication review and consultation. Recognition of the value of pharmacists’ involvement and engagement with other healthcare providers facilitated establishment and continuity of sessional services. Funds pooled from various sources supplemented some pharmacists’ remuneration in the absence of designated government funding. Enhanced employment opportunities, district support and flexibility in services facilitated the continuous operation of the sessional service.

Conclusions: There is potential to address clinical pharmacy service needs in rural hospitals by cross-sector employment of pharmacists. The reported sessional model arrangements, factors impacting on sessional employment of pharmacists and learnings shared by the participants should assist development of similar models in other rural communities. 
Keyword Clinical pharmacy
Hospital
Medication management
Pharmacist
Rural
Sessional
Service models
Qualitative
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article number 567.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Pharmacy Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 30 Jan 2015, 10:19:30 EST by Charna Kovacevic on behalf of School of Pharmacy