A multi-site randomised controlled trial of evidence-based supported employment for adults with severe and persistent mental illness

Waghorn, Geoffrey, Dias, Shannon, Gladman, Beverley, Harris, Meredith and Saha, Sukanta (2014) A multi-site randomised controlled trial of evidence-based supported employment for adults with severe and persistent mental illness. Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, 61 6: 424-436. doi:10.1111/1440-1630.12148


Author Waghorn, Geoffrey
Dias, Shannon
Gladman, Beverley
Harris, Meredith
Saha, Sukanta
Title A multi-site randomised controlled trial of evidence-based supported employment for adults with severe and persistent mental illness
Journal name Australian Occupational Therapy Journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1440-1630
0045-0766
Publication date 2014-12
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/1440-1630.12148
Open Access Status
Volume 61
Issue 6
Start page 424
End page 436
Total pages 13
Place of publication Richmond, VIC, Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background/aim: The Individual Placement and Support (IPS) approach is an evidence-based form of supported employment for people with severe and persistent mental illness. This approach is not yet widely available in Australia even though there is mounting evidence of its generalisability outside the USA. One previous Australian randomised controlled trial found that IPS is effective for young people with first episode psychosis. The aim of the current trial was to assess the effectiveness of evidence-based supported employment when implemented for Australian adult consumers of public mental health services by utilising existing service systems.
Methods: A four-site randomised control trial design (n = 208) was conducted in Brisbane (two sites), Townsville and Cairns. The intervention consisted of an IPS supported employment service hosted by a community mental health team. The control condition was delivered at each site by mental health teams referring consumers to other disability employment services in the local area.
Results: At 12 months, those in the IPS condition had 2.4 times greater odds of commencing employment than those in the control condition (42.5% vs. 23.5%). The conditions did not differ on secondary employment outcomes including job duration, hours worked, or job diversity. Attrition was higher than expected in both conditions with 28.4% completing the baseline interview but taking no further part in the study.
Conclusion: The results support previous international findings that IPS-supported employment is more effective than non-integrated supported employment. IPS can be successfully implemented this way in Australia, but with a loss of effect strength compared to previous USA trials.
Keyword Employment
Psychosis
Schizophrenia
Severe and persistent mental illness
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 7 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Thu, 22 Jan 2015, 12:32:07 EST by Nyree Divitini on behalf of School of Public Health