Psychological health and the risk of diabetes mellitus in Australian women: a 21-year prospective study

Hasan, Syed Shahzad, Clavarino, Alexandra M., Dingle, Kaeleen, Mamun, Abdullah A. and Kairuz, Therese (2014) Psychological health and the risk of diabetes mellitus in Australian women: a 21-year prospective study. Journal of Women's Health, 23 11: 912-919. doi:10.1089/jwh.2014.4832


Author Hasan, Syed Shahzad
Clavarino, Alexandra M.
Dingle, Kaeleen
Mamun, Abdullah A.
Kairuz, Therese
Title Psychological health and the risk of diabetes mellitus in Australian women: a 21-year prospective study
Journal name Journal of Women's Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1931-843X
1540-9996
Publication date 2014-11-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1089/jwh.2014.4832
Open Access Status
Volume 23
Issue 11
Start page 912
End page 919
Total pages 8
Place of publication New Rochelle, NY United States
Publisher Mary Ann Liebert Inc Publishers
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: Symptoms of depression can be recurrent or limited to one episode. This study discusses the prospective association between psychological health, measured as change in depression symptoms, and the risk of diabetes mellitus in Australian women.

Methods: Data obtained from the Mater-University of Queensland Study of Pregnancy. Depression was measured using the Delusions-Symptoms: States Inventory. To examine possible transitions over time, depression was grouped into four categories and assessed at different phases over the 21-year period. Multiple logistic regression models and sensitivity analysis to assess the robustness of our analytical strategy were performed.

Results: Three hundred and one women reported diabetes 21 years after the index pregnancy. Almost one-third of the women who reported depression symptoms continued to report these at a subsequent follow-up (FU) phase. About 1 in 20 women who had not reported depression symptoms at the 5-year FU did so at the subsequent 14-year FU. In prospective analyses, we did not find a significant association between diabetes and negative change (not depressed to depressed, at subsequent phase); however, for women with positive history of symptoms of depression and women with persistent symptoms, there was a 1.97-fold (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.14–3.40) to 2.23-fold (95% CI: 1.09–4.57) greater risk of diabetes.

Conclusions: Our study suggests that an increased risk of diabetes is significantly associated with persistent depression symptoms. It highlights the importance of recognizing depression symptoms in terms of women's psychological wellbeing and thus provides a basis for targeting those most at risk.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
School of Pharmacy Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 22 Jan 2015, 11:56:55 EST by Nyree Divitini on behalf of School of Pharmacy