Stock discrimination of orange roughy, Hoplostethus atlanticus, by parasite analysis

Lester, R. J. G., Sewell, K. B., Barnes, A. and Evans, K. (1988) Stock discrimination of orange roughy, Hoplostethus atlanticus, by parasite analysis. Marine Biology, 99 1: 137-143. doi:10.1007/BF00644988


Author Lester, R. J. G.
Sewell, K. B.
Barnes, A.
Evans, K.
Title Stock discrimination of orange roughy, Hoplostethus atlanticus, by parasite analysis
Formatted title
Stock discrimination of orange roughy, Hoplostethus atlanticus, by parasite analysis
Journal name Marine Biology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0025-3162
1432-1793
Publication date 1988-03
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/BF00644988
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 99
Issue 1
Start page 137
End page 143
Total pages 7
Place of publication Heidelberg, Germany
Publisher Springer
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The parasite fauna of the viscera of 1251 orange roughy, Hoplostethus atlanticus, collected in 1983 to 1986 from eight areas off southern Australia and three areas off New Zealand, was examined for evidence of discrete host populations. Fish from each area were divided into three length groups which averaged close to 28, 37, and 42 cm. Canonical multivariate analysis of data on larval nematodes (Anisakis spp., Terranova sp., and a spirurid) and larval cestodes (Hepatoxylon trichiuri and Callitetrarhynchus sp.) discriminated five Australian and three New Zealand stocks. These were for Australia: (1) Great Australian Bight (2) South Australia/west Victoria/west and south Tasmania, (3) Cascade Plateau/Tasman Rise, (4) north-east Tasmania, (5) New South Wales; and for New Zealand: (1) north-east New Zealand, (2) south-east New Zealand, (3) west New Zealand. No significant differences in parasite fauna were detected between samples of fish taken within the spawning season and those taken outside the spawning season in the same area. In one southern Australian stock there was a north-south cline in the numbers of Anisakis spp. This was apparent in both small (immature) and medium-sized (mature) fish. We conclude that Hoplostethus atlanticus is a sedentary species with little movement between fishmanagement zones.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Faculty of Science Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 22 Jan 2015, 11:47:02 EST by Kim Sewell on behalf of Faculty of Science