Seroprevalence of antibodies to Ross River and Barmah Forest Viruses: possible implications for blood transfusion safety after extreme weather events

Faddy, Helen, Dunford, Melanie, Seed, Clive, Olds, Andrew, Harley, David, Dean, Melinda, Racloz, Vanessa, McCarthy, Suzi, Smith, David and Flower, Robert (2014) Seroprevalence of antibodies to Ross River and Barmah Forest Viruses: possible implications for blood transfusion safety after extreme weather events. EcoHealth, 12 2: 347-353. doi:10.1007/s10393-014-1005-0


Author Faddy, Helen
Dunford, Melanie
Seed, Clive
Olds, Andrew
Harley, David
Dean, Melinda
Racloz, Vanessa
McCarthy, Suzi
Smith, David
Flower, Robert
Title Seroprevalence of antibodies to Ross River and Barmah Forest Viruses: possible implications for blood transfusion safety after extreme weather events
Journal name EcoHealth   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1612-9210
1612-9202
Publication date 2014-12-24
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10393-014-1005-0
Volume 12
Issue 2
Start page 347
End page 353
Total pages 7
Place of publication New York, NY United States
Publisher Springer New York
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Abstract Climate change is predicted to increase the transmission of many vector-borne pathogens, representing an increasing threat to a safe blood supply. In early 2011, Australia experienced catastrophic rainfall and flooding, coupled with increased arbovirus transmission. We used Ross River (RRV) and Barmah Forest (BFV) viruses as test cases to investigate the potential risk posed to Australia’s blood supply after this period of increased rainfall . We estimated the risk of collecting an infected donation as one in 2,500–58,000 for RRV and one in 2,000–28,000 for BFV. Climate change may incrementally increase the arbovirus threat to blood safety.
Keyword Arbovirus
Blood donor
Climate
Rainfall
Risk
Safety
Transfusion
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online ahead of print 24 Dec 2014

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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