Living with antipsychotic medication side-effects: The experience of Australian mental health consumers

Morrison, Paul, Meehan, Tom and Stomski, Norman J. (2015) Living with antipsychotic medication side-effects: The experience of Australian mental health consumers. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 24 3: 253-261. doi:10.1111/inm.12110


Author Morrison, Paul
Meehan, Tom
Stomski, Norman J.
Title Living with antipsychotic medication side-effects: The experience of Australian mental health consumers
Journal name International Journal of Mental Health Nursing   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1445-8330
1447-0349
Publication date 2015-06
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/inm.12110
Volume 24
Issue 3
Start page 253
End page 261
Total pages 9
Place of publication Richmond, VIC Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Abstract The present study explores people's experience of living with antipsychotic medication side-effects. Qualitative data were gathered through semistructured interviews with 10 mental health consumers in a community care setting in Australia. The interview transcriptions were content analysed, and enhanced by combining manifest and latent content. Important contextual cues were identified through replaying the audio-recordings. Several main themes emerged from the analysis, including the impact of side-effects, attitudes to the use of medication and side-effects, and coping strategies to manage medication side-effects. Each participant reported between six and seven side-effects on average, which were often pronounced and had a major disruptive impact on their lives. Of these effects, the most commonly mentioned was sedation, which the participants described as leaving them in a ‘zombie'-like state. Most participants expressed an attitude of acceptance about the side-effects. The participants' most common strategy to manage side-effects was to change the dosage of the medication. Other common side-effect management strategies involved using other medications to control side-effects, and diverse self-help techniques, the most common of which was relaxation/distraction techniques.
Keyword Antipsychotic medication
Consumer
Interviews
Mental health
Qualitative research
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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