High variability of the subjective visual vertical test of vertical perception, in some people with neck pain - should this be a standard measure of cervical proprioception?

Treleaven, Julia and Takasaki, Hiroshi (2015) High variability of the subjective visual vertical test of vertical perception, in some people with neck pain - should this be a standard measure of cervical proprioception?. Manual Therapy, 20 1: 183-188. doi:10.1016/j.math.2014.08.005


Author Treleaven, Julia
Takasaki, Hiroshi
Title High variability of the subjective visual vertical test of vertical perception, in some people with neck pain - should this be a standard measure of cervical proprioception?
Journal name Manual Therapy   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1532-2769
1356-689X
Publication date 2015-02-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.math.2014.08.005
Open Access Status
Volume 20
Issue 1
Start page 183
End page 188
Total pages 6
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Churchill Livingstone
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background

Subjective visual vertical (SVV) assesses visual dependence for spacial orientation, via vertical perception testing. Using the computerized rod-and-frame test (CRFT), SVV is thought to be an important measure of cervical proprioception and might be greater in those with whiplash associated disorder (WAD), but to date research findings are inconsistent.

Objective

The aim of this study was to investigate the most sensitive SVV error measurement to detect group differences between no neck pain control, idiopathic neck pain (INP) and WAD subjects.

Design

Cross sectional study.

Methods

Neck Disability Index (NDI), Dizziness Handicap Inventory short form (DHIsf) and the average constant error (CE), absolute error (AE), root mean square error (RMSE), and variable error (VE) of the SVV were obtained from 142 subjects (48 asymptomatic, 36 INP, 42 WAD).

Results

The INP group had significantly (p < 0.03) greater VE and RMSE when compared to both the control and WAD groups. There were no differences seen between the WAD and controls.

Conclusion

The results demonstrated that people with INP (not WAD), had an altered strategy for maintaining the perception of vertical by increasing variability of performance. This may be due to the complexity of the task. Further, the SVV performance was not related to reported pain or dizziness handicap. These findings are inconsistent with other measures of cervical proprioception in neck pain and more research is required before the SVV can be considered an important measure and utilized clinically.
Keyword Cervical proprioception
Neck pain
Vertical perception
Subjective visual vertical
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online ahead of print 2 Sep 2014

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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