Impact of loading doses on the time to adequate predicted beta-lactam concentrations in prolonged and continuous infusion dosing schemes: reply to Rhodes et al

Roberts, Jason A., Paul, Sanjoy K., Akova, Murat, Bassetti, Matteo, De Waele, Jan J., Dimopoulos, George, Kaukonen, Kirsi-Maija, Koulenti, Despoina, Martin, Claude, Montravers, Philippe, Rello, Jordi, Rhodes, Andrew, Starr, Therese, Wallis, Steven C. and Lipman, Jeffrey (2014) Impact of loading doses on the time to adequate predicted beta-lactam concentrations in prolonged and continuous infusion dosing schemes: reply to Rhodes et al. Clinical Infectious Diseases, 59 6: 907-908. doi:10.1093/cid/ciu403


Author Roberts, Jason A.
Paul, Sanjoy K.
Akova, Murat
Bassetti, Matteo
De Waele, Jan J.
Dimopoulos, George
Kaukonen, Kirsi-Maija
Koulenti, Despoina
Martin, Claude
Montravers, Philippe
Rello, Jordi
Rhodes, Andrew
Starr, Therese
Wallis, Steven C.
Lipman, Jeffrey
Title Impact of loading doses on the time to adequate predicted beta-lactam concentrations in prolonged and continuous infusion dosing schemes: reply to Rhodes et al
Journal name Clinical Infectious Diseases   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1058-4838
1537-6591
Publication date 2014-09-15
Sub-type Letter to editor, brief commentary or brief communication
DOI 10.1093/cid/ciu403
Open Access Status
Volume 59
Issue 6
Start page 907
End page 908
Total pages 2
Place of publication Cary, NC, United States
Publisher Oxford University Press
Language eng
Formatted abstract
We read with interest the letter from Rhodes et al [doi:10.1093/cid/ciu402] in response to the DALI study (Defining Antibiotic Levels in Intensive Care Unit Patients) published earlier this year in Clinical Infectious Diseases. The authors provided their own loading dose pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic simulations before both extended and continuous infusions. In contrast to standard probability of target attainment figures that provide results over a dosing interval or 24-hour period, the authors provided data for the first 120 minutes of therapy. Unsurprisingly, the authors showed that a loading dose is associated with improved achievement of target antibiotic exposures over this time...
Q-Index Code CX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Letter to editor, brief commentary or brief communication
Collection: School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 08 Jan 2015, 14:43:43 EST by Nyree Divitini on behalf of School of Public Health