A vertical mouse and ergonomic mouse pads alter wrist position but do not reduce carpal tunnel pressure in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome

Schmid, Annina B., Kubler, Paul A., Johnston, Venerina and Coppieters, Michel W. (2015) A vertical mouse and ergonomic mouse pads alter wrist position but do not reduce carpal tunnel pressure in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. Applied Ergonomics, 47 151-156. doi:10.1016/j.apergo.2014.08.020


Author Schmid, Annina B.
Kubler, Paul A.
Johnston, Venerina
Coppieters, Michel W.
Title A vertical mouse and ergonomic mouse pads alter wrist position but do not reduce carpal tunnel pressure in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome
Journal name Applied Ergonomics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1872-9126
0003-6870
Publication date 2015-03
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.apergo.2014.08.020
Open Access Status
Volume 47
Start page 151
End page 156
Total pages 6
Place of publication Kidlington, Oxford United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon Press
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Abstract Non-neutral wrist positions and external pressure leading to increased carpal tunnel pressure during computer use have been associated with a heightened risk of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). This study investigated whether commonly used ergonomic devices reduce carpal tunnel pressure in patients with CTS. Carpal tunnel pressure was measured in twenty-one patients with CTS before, during and after a computer mouse task using a standard mouse, a vertical mouse, a gel mouse pad and a gliding palm support. Carpal tunnel pressure increased while operating a computer mouse. Although the vertical mouse significantly reduced ulnar deviation and the gel mouse pad and gliding palm support decreased wrist extension, none of the ergonomic devices reduced carpal tunnel pressure. The findings of this study do therefore not endorse a strong recommendation for or against any of the ergonomic devices commonly recommended for patients with CTS. Selection of ergonomic devices remains dependent on personal preference.
Keyword Carpal tunnel syndrome
Computer use
Ergonomic workplace
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online ahead of print 3 Oct 2014

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
School of Medicine Publications
 
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