The neutralization of arthropod-borne viruses: a study of cross reactions and parameters affecting specificity, principally in the tissue culture system

Westaway, Edwin George (1965). The neutralization of arthropod-borne viruses: a study of cross reactions and parameters affecting specificity, principally in the tissue culture system PhD Thesis, School of Molecular and Microbial Sciences, The University of Queensland. doi:10.14264/uql.2015.18

       
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Author Westaway, Edwin George
Thesis Title The neutralization of arthropod-borne viruses: a study of cross reactions and parameters affecting specificity, principally in the tissue culture system
School, Centre or Institute School of Molecular and Microbial Sciences
Institution The University of Queensland
DOI 10.14264/uql.2015.18
Publication date 1965-01-01
Thesis type PhD Thesis
Supervisor Unknown
Total pages 200
Language eng
Subjects 060506 Virology
Formatted abstract
In recent years a major activity at the Queensland Institute of Medical Research has been an investigation of arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) in Queensland, comprising isolation and characterization of several agents, and studies of their epidemiology. The work reported here formed part of that study.

Arboviruses comprise a large number (approximately 150) of ether-sensitive viruses able to multiply in arthropod vectors which transmit than from one vertebrate host to another. They are divided by serological tests into several groups, of which the largest, group B, has at least 36 members. Within this group the degree of serological cross reaction is particularly high, and as several of these viruses are the aetiological agents of severe clinical disease e.g. yellow fever, dengue fever, Murray Valley and tick-borne encephalitis, serious problems arise in regard to diagnosis and epidemiology.

A number of previously unknown group B (and other) arboviruses have recently been isolated by Doherty and colleagues at the Queensland Institute of Medical Research from mosquitoes collected in north Queensland. The intra-group relationship» of these isolates are of interest because of their possible epidemiological, evolutionary and taxonomic significance. For such purposes the complement-fixation and haemagglutination-inhibition tests supply only limited information because of their broad reactivity within the group B viruses. Comparisons by neutralization tests are more easily interpreted provided the tests used can be shown to be both specific and sensitive. These requirements have been met in other fields by the development of cell culture methods but when this study commenced no satisfactory cell system for group B arboviruses had been introduced.

The present study was designed to develop in vitro neutralization techniques, to test their specificity (as compared with the standard mouse tests) and to apply them to studies of intra-group relationships among group B arboviruses. The basis of a neutralization test was studied by plaque counting methods using chick embryo fibroblast monolayers and cross reactions between four viruses were evaluated. However only a limited number of group B members produced plaques in this system and subsequently a continuous mammalian cell line provided a useful tool for the study of cross reactions by plaque techniques among ten group B arboviruses.
Keyword Arboviruses
Virology -- Research

Document type: Thesis
Collection: UQ Theses (RHD) - UQ staff and students only
 
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