Issues in Professional Training to Implement Evidence-based Parenting Programs: The Preferences of Indigenous Practitioners

Turner, Karen M. T., Sanders, Matthew R. and Hodge, Lauren (2014) Issues in Professional Training to Implement Evidence-based Parenting Programs: The Preferences of Indigenous Practitioners. Australian Psychologist, 49 6: 384-394. doi:10.1111/ap.12090


Author Turner, Karen M. T.
Sanders, Matthew R.
Hodge, Lauren
Title Issues in Professional Training to Implement Evidence-based Parenting Programs: The Preferences of Indigenous Practitioners
Journal name Australian Psychologist   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0005-0067
1742-9544
Publication date 2014-12
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/ap.12090
Open Access Status
Volume 49
Issue 6
Start page 384
End page 394
Total pages 11
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher John Wiley and Sons
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Indigenous children have elevated risk for poor health, behavioural, emotional, and social outcomes. Significant evidence exists that parenting programs can reduce family risk factors and improve outcomes for children and families; however, mainstream programs have had slower uptake in Indigenous communities than other communities. Culturally sensitive delivery of evidence-based programs can enhance engagement of parents, yet the development of a workforce to deliver programs to Indigenous parents faces many obstacles. This project seeks to identify professional training processes that enhance Indigenous practitioners’ skills and confidence in delivering an evidence-based parenting program. A survey of trained parenting practitioners via an online practitioner network assessed their views of the training and post-training support processes they had experienced. Respondents were 57 Indigenous and 720 non-Indigenous practitioners from 15 countries. Most training processes were rated equally helpful by Indigenous and non-Indigenous practitioners. However, several training processes were identified as important for the delivery of culturally competent training, such as tailoring the pace of training and simplifying the language in teaching resources. Practitioners with higher ratings of the helpfulness of peer support following training reported higher program uptake and implementation. Qualitative themes also focused on the helpfulness of program resources, and having a peer support network and mentoring. Increasing access to appropriate, flexibly delivered training and post-training support for Indigenous professionals will support the development of a skilled workforce with local knowledge and connections, and further increase the reach of evidence-based services in Indigenous communities.
Keyword Cultural tailoring
Evidence based programs
Implementation
Indigenous
Professional Training
Triple P
Positive Parenting Program
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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