Typical scores from the 1.2km shuttle run test to determine maximal aerobic speed

Kelly, Vincent G., Jackson, Elliot and Wood, Anthony (2014). Typical scores from the 1.2km shuttle run test to determine maximal aerobic speed. In: 2014 ASCA International Conference on Applied Strength and Conditioning, Melbourne, Australia, (183-185). 7-9 December 2014.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Kelly, Vincent G.
Jackson, Elliot
Wood, Anthony
Title of paper Typical scores from the 1.2km shuttle run test to determine maximal aerobic speed
Conference name 2014 ASCA International Conference on Applied Strength and Conditioning
Conference location Melbourne, Australia
Conference dates 7-9 December 2014
Journal name Journal of Australian Strength and Conditioning
Place of Publication Beenleigh, QLD, Australia
Publisher Australian Strength and Conditioning Association
Publication Year 2014
Sub-type Fully published paper
Open Access Status
ISSN 1836-649X
1835-7644
Volume 22
Issue 5
Start page 183
End page 185
Total pages 3
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Intermittent training is frequently used by team sport players to improve performance (2,3,11,12). The running velocity sustained during intermittent training has a significant effect on the oxygen uptake (VO2) and the increase in aerobic capacity after a period of intermittent training is greatly affected by the intensity of training (10). Recently, a new 1.2km shuttle run test (1.2SRT) has exhibited a strong correlation with the 30-15 intermittent fitness test (30-15IFT) (6) and consequently can be used to determine a maximal running speed (MRS) score for team sport athletes to train at during intermittent exercise (10). The intensity of interval training running speed can be expressed as a percentage of MRS and modified dependent on the physical capacity being trained. A range of percentages between 60 – 130% MRS have been reported based on the test used to determine MRS. Also the reliability of this test has recently been examined with an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.99 for performance time and MRS which compare favourably with other running capacity tests performed to exhaustion (5). This test is time efficient, easy to administer and does not have a significant impact on total training time. As a physical fitness test becomes more popular it is important to establish sport specific and position specific standards. This will enable practitioners the opportunity to benchmark the results of their athletes and compare them with other similar athletes. The aim of this study was to report the typical performance time to complete the 1.2SRT of different sports, genders, level of competition and age groups and also to report the subsequent MRS to be used for conditioning programming prescription.
Keyword Maximal aerobic speed
Conditioning
Intermittent exercise
Q-Index Code CX
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
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Created: Thu, 18 Dec 2014, 22:05:48 EST by Vincent Kelly on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences