Simulation and Analysis of Three-Dimensional Turbulent Hypersonic Shockwave Boundary Layer Interactions

Gehrke, Chris (2013). Simulation and Analysis of Three-Dimensional Turbulent Hypersonic Shockwave Boundary Layer Interactions B.Sc Thesis, School of Engineering, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Gehrke, Chris
Thesis Title Simulation and Analysis of Three-Dimensional Turbulent Hypersonic Shockwave Boundary Layer Interactions
School, Centre or Institute School of Engineering
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2013
Thesis type B.Sc Thesis
Supervisor Russell Boyce
Total pages 68
Language eng
Subjects 0901 Aerospace Engineering
0913 Mechanical Engineering
Formatted abstract
The focus of this thesis is on modelling the effects three-dimensionality in a shock wave boundary layer interaction (SWBLI). An experiment performed by Boyce & Hillier in 2000 provides data as a source of validation for the simulation. The main aims of the thesis are to: demonstrate an understanding of SWBLI behaviour; develop a suitable model in agreement with the experimental data, and; provide a way forward for further research in the field.

The experiment consisted of a cowl placed around a cylindrical centrebody in a flowfield to externally generate a shock wave which impinged on the boundary layer of the centrebody, resulting in a SWBLI. The cowl was vertically misaligned to develop the three-dimensional flow. The fluid used in the flow was nitrogen, with approximate initial freestream conditions of Mach 9, and Reynoldfs number of 50 X 106 m-1.

Review of relevant literature provided a solid understanding of the concepts and characteristics of SWBLIs. The model was simulated using the commercial computational fluid dynamics program CFD++ with the shear stress transport turbulence model and Reynoldfs-averaged Navier-Stokes equations.

A coarse mesh, with 1.6 million cells, provided an initial solution to compare with the experimental data. This was then used as a reference point in a grid sensitivity study to determine the effectiveness of different sized meshes in simulating the experiment. A finer mesh, with 19.6 million cells demonstrated good agreement with the experimental heat flux and surface pressure data. This is a significant step forward in developing a predictive model of SWBLIs to be used in the design process of hypersonic vehicles.
Keyword turbulent
Hypersonic shock layers
Three dimensional (3D)

Document type: Thesis
Collection: UQ Theses (non-RHD) - UQ staff and students only
 
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Created: Tue, 16 Dec 2014, 10:37:16 EST by Ahmed Taha Siddiqui on behalf of Scholarly Communication and Digitisation Service