A new species of the basal "kangaroo" Balbaroo and a re-evaluation of stem macropodiform interrelationships

Black, Karen H., Travouillon, Kenny J., Den Boer, Wendy, Kear, Benjamin P., Cooke, Bernard N. and Archer, Michael (2014) A new species of the basal "kangaroo" Balbaroo and a re-evaluation of stem macropodiform interrelationships. PLoS One, 9 11: e112705.1-e112705.30. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0112705


Author Black, Karen H.
Travouillon, Kenny J.
Den Boer, Wendy
Kear, Benjamin P.
Cooke, Bernard N.
Archer, Michael
Title A new species of the basal "kangaroo" Balbaroo and a re-evaluation of stem macropodiform interrelationships
Journal name PLoS One   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1932-6203
Publication date 2014-11-19
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0112705
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 9
Issue 11
Start page e112705.1
End page e112705.30
Total pages 30
Place of publication San Francisco, CA United States
Publisher Public Library of Science
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Exceptionally well-preserved skulls and postcranial elements of a new species of the plesiomorphic stem macropodiform Balbaroo have been recovered from middle Miocene freshwater limestone deposits in the Riversleigh World Heritage Area of northwestern Queensland, Australia. This constitutes the richest intraspecific sample for any currently known basal “kangaroo”, and, along with additional material referred to Balbaroo fangaroo, provides new insights into structural variability within the most prolific archaic macropodiform clade – Balbaridae. Qualitative and metric evaluations of taxonomic boundaries demonstrate that the previously distinct species Nambaroo bullockensis is a junior synonym of B. camfieldensis. Furthermore, coupled Maximum Parsimony and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses reveal that our new Balbaroo remains represent the most derived member of the Balbaroo lineage, and are closely related to the middle Miocene B. camfieldensis, which like most named balbarid species is identifiable only from isolated jaws. The postcranial elements of Balbaroo concur with earlier finds of the stratigraphically oldest balbarid skeleton, Nambaroo gillespieae, and suggest that quadrupedal progression was a primary gait mode as opposed to bipedal saltation. All Balbaroo spp. have low-crowned bilophodont molars, which are typical for browsing herbivores inhabiting the densely forested environments envisaged for middle Miocene northeastern Australia.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Earth Sciences Publications
Official 2015 Collection
 
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