The impact of relative humidity and atmospheric pressure on mortality in Guangzhou, China

Ou, Chun Quan, Yang, Jun, Ou, Qiao Qun, Zhang, Liu Hua, Lin, Guo Zhen, Chen, Ping Yan, Qian, Jun and Guo, Yu Ming (2014) The impact of relative humidity and atmospheric pressure on mortality in Guangzhou, China. Biomedical and Environmental Sciences, 27 12: 917-925. doi:10.3967/bes2014.132

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Author Ou, Chun Quan
Yang, Jun
Ou, Qiao Qun
Zhang, Liu Hua
Lin, Guo Zhen
Chen, Ping Yan
Qian, Jun
Guo, Yu Ming
Title The impact of relative humidity and atmospheric pressure on mortality in Guangzhou, China
Journal name Biomedical and Environmental Sciences   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0895-3988
2214-0190
Publication date 2014-12-08
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3967/bes2014.132
Open Access Status
Volume 27
Issue 12
Start page 917
End page 925
Total pages 9
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective: Although many studies have examined the effects of ambient temperatures on mortality, little evidence is on health impacts of atmospheric pressure and relative humidity. This study aimed to assess the impacts of atmospheric pressure and relative humidity on mortality in Guangzhou, China.

Methods: This study included 213,737 registered deaths during 2003-2011 in Guangzhou, China. A quasi-Poisson regression with a distributed lag non-linear model was used to assess the effects of atmospheric pressure/relative humidity.

Results: We found significant effect of low atmospheric pressure/relative humidity on mortality. There was a 1.79% (95% confidence interval: 0.38%-3.22%) increase in non-accidental mortality and a 2.27% (0.07%-4.51%) increase in cardiovascular mortality comparing the 5th and 25th percentile of atmospheric pressure. A 3.97% (0.67%-7.39%) increase in cardiovascular mortality was also observed comparing the 5th and 25th percentile of relative humidity. Women were more vulnerable to decrease in atmospheric pressure and relative humidity than men. Age and education attainment were also potential effect modifiers. Furthermore, low atmospheric pressure and relative humidity increased temperature-related mortality.

Conclusion: Both low atmospheric pressure and relative humidity are important risk factors of mortality. Our findings would be helpful to develop health risk assessment and climate policy interventions that would better protect vulnerable subgroups of the population.
Keyword Relative humidity
Atmospheric pressure
Temperature
Mortality
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 15 Dec 2014, 17:56:05 EST by Yuming Guo on behalf of School of Public Health