Bacteraemia caused by beta-haemolytic streptococci in North Queensland: changing trends over a 14-year period

Harris, P., Siew, D-A., Proud, M., Buettner, P. and Norton, R. (2011) Bacteraemia caused by beta-haemolytic streptococci in North Queensland: changing trends over a 14-year period. Clinical Microbiology and Infection, 17 8: 1216-1222. doi:10.1111/j.1469-0691.2010.03427.x


Author Harris, P.
Siew, D-A.
Proud, M.
Buettner, P.
Norton, R.
Title Bacteraemia caused by beta-haemolytic streptococci in North Queensland: changing trends over a 14-year period
Journal name Clinical Microbiology and Infection   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1198-743X
1469-0691
Publication date 2011-08
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1469-0691.2010.03427.x
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 17
Issue 8
Start page 1216
End page 1222
Total pages 7
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Group A streptococci (GAS) are usually the predominant species in cases of bacteraemia caused by β haemolytic streptococci (BHS). An increasing worldwide incidence of invasive disease from non-group A BHS has been reported. Little is known about the changing trends in invasive disease caused by BHS in Australia. North Queensland has a relatively large indigenous population, who experience significantly higher rates of group A-related disease than the non-indigenous population. This prospective study examined changing trends of disease from large colony BHS that group with A, B, C and G antisera over a 14-year period at the single large tertiary referral hospital in the area. We identified 392 bacteraemic episodes caused by BHS. GAS were most commonly isolated (49%), with adjusted rates remaining stable over the period. There was a significant increase in the incidence of non-neonatal bacteraemia caused by group B streptococci (GBS) over the study period (r=0.58; p0.030), largely driven by infection in older, non-indigenous women. Rates of bacteraemia caused by group C streptococci also experienced a modest, but significant, increase over time (r=0.67; p0.009). GAS, which had no predominant emm type, were seen most commonly in indigenous subjects (52%). Mortality rates ranged from 3.2% (group G) to 10.3% (group C), with a rate of 7.9% associated with group A disease. The marked rise in GBS disease has been noted worldwide, but the relatively low incidence in indigenous Australian patients has not been described before, despite the burden of well-recognized risk factors for GBS disease within this group.
Keyword β-haemolytic streptococci
Australia
Bacteraemia
Indigenous
North Queensland
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Medicine Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 9 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 10 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Mon, 15 Dec 2014, 12:40:27 EST by Ms Kate Rowe on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)