Clinical features that affect indirect-hemagglutination-assay responses to Burkholderia pseudomallei

Harris, Patrick N. A., Ketheesan, Natkunam, Owens, Leigh and Norton, Robert E. (2009) Clinical features that affect indirect-hemagglutination-assay responses to Burkholderia pseudomallei. Clinical and Vaccine Immunology, 16 6: 924-930. doi:10.1128/CVI.00026-09


Author Harris, Patrick N. A.
Ketheesan, Natkunam
Owens, Leigh
Norton, Robert E.
Title Clinical features that affect indirect-hemagglutination-assay responses to Burkholderia pseudomallei
Formatted title
Clinical features that affect indirect-hemagglutination-assay responses to Burkholderia pseudomallei
Journal name Clinical and Vaccine Immunology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1556-6811
1556-679X
Publication date 2009-06-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1128/CVI.00026-09
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 16
Issue 6
Start page 924
End page 930
Total pages 7
Place of publication Washington, DC United States
Publisher American Society for Microbiology
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Melioidosis, a disease endemic to northern Australia and Southeast Asia, is caused by the soil saprophyte Burkholderia pseudomallei. The indirect hemagglutination assay (IHA) is the most frequently used serological test to help confirm exposure to the causative organism. However, despite culture-confirmed disease, patients often have a negative IHA result at presentation and occasionally fail to seroconvert in serial testing. We retrospectively examined results for all patients with culture-confirmed melioidosis from our laboratory between January 1996 and August 2008. One hundred forty patients had a recorded IHA titer at presentation, 71 of which were positive at a titer of 1:40 or greater. Fifty-three patients went on to have subsequent IHAs 1 month or more after presentation. The relationships between IHA responses and clinical features were examined. The presence of bacteremia was significantly associated with a negative IHA at presentation. The coexistence of diabetes was associated with the presence of a positive IHA at presentation. In total, 14 patients (26%) demonstrated persistently negative IHA titers upon serial testing. No clinical factors were found to be significantly associated with this phenomenon. Supplementary testing using melioidosis-specific immunoglobulin G by EIA demonstrated different effects, with only Aboriginal or Torres Straits Islander ethnicity being significantly associated with a positive EIA at presentation. Reasons for these findings are examined, and directions for future research are discussed.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Medicine Publications
 
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