Deadly choices community health events: a health promotion initiative for urban Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

Malseed, Claire, Nelson, Alison, Ware, Robert, Lacey, Ian and Lander, Keiron (2014) Deadly choices community health events: a health promotion initiative for urban Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Australian Journal of Primary Health, 20 4: 379-383. doi:10.1071/PY14041


Author Malseed, Claire
Nelson, Alison
Ware, Robert
Lacey, Ian
Lander, Keiron
Title Deadly choices community health events: a health promotion initiative for urban Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
Formatted title
Deadly choicesTM community health events: a health promotion initiative for urban Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
Journal name Australian Journal of Primary Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1836-7399
1448-7527
Publication date 2014
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/PY14041
Open Access Status
Volume 20
Issue 4
Start page 379
End page 383
Total pages 5
Place of publication Clayton, VIC, Australia
Publisher C S I R O Publishing
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Abstract The present study was an evaluation of the effectiveness of Deadly Choices™ community events for improving participants’ short-term knowledge of chronic disease and risk factors, and increasing community engagement with local health services. Surveys were completed directly before and after participating in health education activities (pre and post surveys, respectively) assessing knowledge of chronic diseases and risk factors at three Deadly Choices community events and four National Aboriginal and Islander Day Observance Committee (NAIDOC) events in south-east Queensland where Deadly Choices health education activities took place. An audit trail was conducted at two Deadly Choices community events in Brisbane to identify the proportion of participants who undertook a health screen at the event who then followed up for a Medicare-funded health check (MBS item 715) or other appointment at an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander clinic in the local area within 2 months. Results were compared with a sample of participants who attended one Deadly Choices community event but did not complete a health screen. There were 472 community members who completed a pre and post survey. All knowledge scores significantly improved between baseline and follow up. Although based on a small sample, the audit trail results suggest individuals who participated in a health screen at the community day were approximately twice as likely to go back to a clinic to receive a full health check or have an alternative appointment compared with attendees who did not participate in a screen. Community events that include opportunities for health education and health screening are an effective strategy to improve chronic disease health literacy skills and appear to have the potential to increase community engagement with local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health services.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies Unit Publications
Official 2015 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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