Legacy of the 1914-18 war 1 How World War 1 changed global attitudes to war and infectious diseases

Shanks, G. Dennis (2014) Legacy of the 1914-18 war 1 How World War 1 changed global attitudes to war and infectious diseases. Lancet, 384 9955: 1699-1707. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(14)61786-4


Author Shanks, G. Dennis
Title Legacy of the 1914-18 war 1 How World War 1 changed global attitudes to war and infectious diseases
Journal name Lancet   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0140-6736
1474-547X
Publication date 2014-11
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/S0140-6736(14)61786-4
Open Access Status
Volume 384
Issue 9955
Start page 1699
End page 1707
Total pages 9
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher The Lancet Publishing Group
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
World War 1 was a key transition point towards scientific medicine. Medical officers incorporated Louis Pasteur's discoveries into their understanding of microorganisms as the cause of infectious diseases, which were therefore susceptible to rational control and treatment measures even in the pre-antibiotic era. Typhoid vaccination led to the successful evasion of the disastrous epidemics of previous wars. The incidence of tetanus was probably decreased by giving millions of doses of horse antitoxin to wounded soldiers. Quinine treated but could not control malaria; its use required mass compulsion. Tuberculosis was not a great military problem during World War 1, although mortality in civilian populations increased substantially. Treatment of sexually transmitted infections remained a matter of aversive conditioning, with invasive antiseptics used in the absence of antibiotics. Pandemic influenza in 1918–19 killed more people than died during the entire war, showing how much remained beyond the capability of the scientists and doctors who fought infectious diseases during World War 1.
Keyword Pandemic Influenza
Tuberculous Soldier
Purulent Bronchitis
Spanish Influenza
United States
Tetanus
Malaria
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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