Planning policies for rural residential development

Adams, John Stephen (1980). Planning policies for rural residential development Other, School of Geography, Planning and Architecture, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Adams, John Stephen
Thesis Title Planning policies for rural residential development
School, Centre or Institute School of Geography, Planning and Architecture
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 1980
Thesis type Other
Supervisor Colin Taylor
Total pages 219
Language eng
Subjects 120505 Regional Analysis and Development
120501 Community Planning
Formatted abstract
The central aim of this exposition is to develop a suitable process and to identify appropriate policies for the planning and control of rural residential development. The primary goal of the planning process and the ensuing planning policies should be to minimize the problems and maximize the benefits of this form of development. To achieve the central aim of this exposition a number of steps were required.

Firstly the various problems, deficiencies and advantages attributed to rural residential development are discussed. Where possible a critical comment is given as to the validity of the various arguments presented.

In Chapter One the effects of rural residential development on agriculture are discussed. In this chapter the following issues are considered
* the effects of rural residential development on the availability of good agricultural land and the consequences of this for agricultural productivity;
* the effects of rural residential development on land values and rates and their effects on agricultural productivity;
* the conflicts between rural residential development and commercial agriculture which affect the compatibility of the two land uses; and
* the questionable productivity of hobby farms.

In Chapter Two additional, detrimental effects of rural residential development are discussed. In this chapter the following issues are considered
* the effects of rural residential development on other resources (apart from agriculture);
* the effects of vacant rural residential land;
* the effects of rural residential development upon the cost of providing public utility services;
* the effects of rural residential development on the environment;
* the effects of rural residential development in the pre-emption of further urban development;
* the effects of old, inappropriate subdivisions;
* the effects of sporadic rural residential development; and
* the effects of ribbon rural residential development.

The benefits attributed to rural residential development are discussed in Chapter Three. In this chapter the following issues are considered
* the advantages of rural residential development for the farmer;
* the advantages of rural residential development as a source of revenue for Local Authorities; and
* the advantages of living in a rural residential development.

Secondly, in Chapter Four the findings of the former chapters are summarized in an attempt
* to identify whether rural residential development is benefical or detrimental and thus a desirable form of development; and
* to discuss the need for planning intervention in the market allocation of land for rural residential purposes.

Thirdly, the traditional planning response to rural residential development is discussed in Chapter Five. The writer has considered the traditional planning response to rural residential development as a rather slow, evolutionary process. In this chapter the various steps in this evolutionary process,and the deficiencies of the various planning policies which have been developed,are discussed.

Finally, in Chapter Six a recommended process for the planning and control of rural residential development is outlined. In the remaining chapters each of the stages in this process are discussed in greater detail.

The first stage of the planning process (the measurement or definition of three separate inputs - Demand, Supply and Goals and Objectives) is discussed in Chapter Seven.

In Chapter Eight, the second stage (involving the matching of supply and demand in accordance with the goals and objectives) is discussed.

An examination of policies for the encouragement of alternative forms of rural residential development such as traditional rural residential subdivision, group development, village extension and minimal services subdivision (the third stage) is undertaken in Chapter Nine.

The fourth stage of the process (Chapter Ten) involves the development of Strategic and Detailed Plans and the selection of specific policies (such as for landscaping, the staging of development and the provision of services) for the planning and control of rural residential development.

In the final chapter (Chapter Eleven) various methods for the implementation of planning policies are discussed. Both incentive and restrictive methods are considered.
Keyword Thesis -- BRTP
Additional Notes Incorrect page sequence between page 13 and 15, and between page 37 and 40.

Document type: Thesis
Collection: UQ Theses (non-RHD) - UQ staff and students only
 
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Created: Wed, 10 Dec 2014, 16:00:44 EST by Mary-Anne Marrington on behalf of Scholarly Communication and Digitisation Service