Interventions to promote physical activity in young people conducted in the hours immediately after school: a systematic review

Atkin, Andrew J., Gorely, Trish, Biddle, Stuart J. H., Cavill, Nick and Foster, Charles (2011) Interventions to promote physical activity in young people conducted in the hours immediately after school: a systematic review. International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 18 3: 176-187. doi:10.1007/s12529-010-9111-z

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Author Atkin, Andrew J.
Gorely, Trish
Biddle, Stuart J. H.
Cavill, Nick
Foster, Charles
Title Interventions to promote physical activity in young people conducted in the hours immediately after school: a systematic review
Journal name International Journal of Behavioral Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1070-5503
1532-7558
Publication date 2011-09
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s12529-010-9111-z
Open Access Status
Volume 18
Issue 3
Start page 176
End page 187
Total pages 12
Place of publication New York, NY, United States
Publisher Springer
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: After school is a critical period in the physical activity and sedentary behaviour patterns of young people. Interventions to promote physical activity during these hours should be informed by existing evidence.

Purpose: The present study provides a systematic review of interventions to promote physical activity in young people conducted in the hours immediately after school.

Methods: The review was conducted in accordance with guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence. Studies were located through searches of electronic databases, including MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsychINFO and ERIC. For included studies, data were extracted and methodological quality assessed using standardised forms.

Results: Ten papers, reporting nine studies, met inclusion criteria. Three studies reported positive changes in physical activity and six indicated no change. Evidence suggests that single-behaviour interventions may be most effective during these hours.

Conclusion: Limitations in study design, lack of statistical power and problems with implementation have likely hindered the effectiveness of interventions in the after-school setting to date. Further work is required to develop interventions during this critical period of the day.
Keyword After school
Interventions
Physical activity
Review
Youth
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 04 Dec 2014, 09:46:07 EST by Sandrine Ducrot on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences