The midbrain periaqueductal gray changes the eupneic respiratory rhythm into a breathing pattern necessary for survival of the individual and of the species

Subramanian, Hari H. and Holstege, Gert (2014) The midbrain periaqueductal gray changes the eupneic respiratory rhythm into a breathing pattern necessary for survival of the individual and of the species. Progress in Brain Research, 212 C: 351-384. doi:10.1016/B978-0-444-63488-7.00017-3


Author Subramanian, Hari H.
Holstege, Gert
Title The midbrain periaqueductal gray changes the eupneic respiratory rhythm into a breathing pattern necessary for survival of the individual and of the species
Journal name Progress in Brain Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0079-6123
1875-7855
ISBN 978-0-444-63488-7
Publication date 2014
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/B978-0-444-63488-7.00017-3
Open Access Status
Volume 212
Issue C
Start page 351
End page 384
Total pages 34
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Modulation of respiration is a prerequisite for survival of the individual and of the species. For example, respiration has to be adjusted in case of speech, strenuous exercise, laughing, crying, or sudden escape from danger. Respiratory centers in pons and medulla generate the basic respiratory rhythm or eupnea, but they cannot modulate breathing in the context of emotional challenges, for which they need input from higher brain centers. In simple terms, the prefrontal cortex integrates visual, auditory, olfactory, and somatosensory information and informs subcortical structures such as amygdala, hypothalamus, and finally the midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG) about the results. The PAG, in turn, generates the final motor output for basic survival, such as setting the level of all cells in the brain and spinal cord. Best known in this framework is determining the level of pain perception. The PAG also controls heart rate, blood pressure, micturition, sexual behavior, vocalization, and many other basic motor output systems. Within this context, the PAG also changes the eupneic respiratory rhythm into a breathing pattern necessary for basic survival. This review examines the latest developments regarding of how the PAG controls respiration.
Keyword Amygdala
Apnea
Breathing control
Deep brain stimulation
Dyspnea
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: UQ Centre for Clinical Research Publications
Official 2015 Collection
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 6 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 10 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Wed, 03 Dec 2014, 11:47:59 EST by Roheen Gill on behalf of UQ Centre for Clinical Research