Benefits of integrating complementarity into priority threat management

Chades, Iadine, Nicol, Sam, van Leeuwen, Stephen, Walters, Belinda, Firn, Jennifer, Reeson, Andrew, Martin, Tara G. and Carwardine, Josi (2014) Benefits of integrating complementarity into priority threat management. Conservation Biology, 29 2: 525-536. doi:10.1111/cobi.12413


Author Chades, Iadine
Nicol, Sam
van Leeuwen, Stephen
Walters, Belinda
Firn, Jennifer
Reeson, Andrew
Martin, Tara G.
Carwardine, Josi
Title Benefits of integrating complementarity into priority threat management
Journal name Conservation Biology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0888-8892
1523-1739
Publication date 2014
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/cobi.12413
Open Access Status
Volume 29
Issue 2
Start page 525
End page 536
Total pages 12
Place of publication Hoboken, NJ United States
Publisher Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Conservation decision tools based on cost-effectiveness analysis are used to assess threat management strategies for improving species persistence. These approaches rank alternative strategies by their benefit to cost ratio but may fail to identify the optimal sets of strategies to implement under limited budgets because they do not account for redundancies. We devised a multiobjective optimization approach in which the complementarity principle is applied to identify the sets of threat management strategies that protect the most species for any budget. We used our approach to prioritize threat management strategies for 53 species of conservation concern in the Pilbara, Australia. We followed a structured elicitation approach to collect information on the benefits and costs of implementing 17 different conservation strategies during a 3-day workshop with 49 stakeholders and experts in the biodiversity, conservation, and management of the Pilbara.  We compared the performance of our complementarity priority threat management approach with a current cost-effectiveness ranking approach. A complementary set of 3 strategies: domestic herbivore management, fire management and research, and sanctuaries provided all species with >50% chance of persistence for $4.7 million/year over 20 years. Achieving the same result cost almost twice as much ($9.71 million/year) when strategies were selected by their cost-effectiveness ranks alone. Our results show that complementarity of management benefits has the potential to double the impact of priority threat management approaches.
Keyword Australia
Conservation
Cost-effectiveness
Multiobjective optimization
Pareto
Pilbara
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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