What has research over the past two decades revealed about the adverse health effects of recreational cannabis use?

Hall, Wayne (2014) What has research over the past two decades revealed about the adverse health effects of recreational cannabis use?. Addiction, 110 1: 19-35. doi:10.1111/add.12703

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Hall_2014_20ycann_OA_post.pdf Full text (open access) application/pdf 336.39KB 0

Author Hall, Wayne
Title What has research over the past two decades revealed about the adverse health effects of recreational cannabis use?
Journal name Addiction   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0965-2140
1360-0443
Publication date 2014
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/add.12703
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 110
Issue 1
Start page 19
End page 35
Total pages 17
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Aims
To examine changes in the evidence on the adverse health effects of cannabis since 1993.

Methods
A comparison of the evidence in 1993 with the evidence and interpretation of the same health outcomes in 2013.

Results
Research in the past 20 years has shown that driving while cannabis-impaired approximately doubles car crash risk and that around one in 10 regular cannabis users develop dependence. Regular cannabis use in adolescence approximately doubles the risks of early school-leaving and of cognitive impairment and psychoses in adulthood. Regular cannabis use in adolescence is also associated strongly with the use of other illicit drugs. These associations persist after controlling for plausible confounding variables in longitudinal studies. This suggests that cannabis use is a contributory cause of these outcomes but some researchers still argue that these relationships are explained by shared causes or risk factors. Cannabis smoking probably increases cardiovascular disease risk in middle-aged adults but its effects on respiratory function and respiratory cancer remain unclear, because most cannabis smokers have smoked or still smoke tobacco.

Conclusions
The epidemiological literature in the past 20 years shows that cannabis use increases the risk of accidents and can produce dependence, and that there are consistent associations between regular cannabis use and poor psychosocial outcomes and mental health in adulthood.
Keyword Cannabis
Dependence
Drug-related harms
Epidemiology
Health risks
Mental health
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: UQ Centre for Clinical Research Publications
Official 2015 Collection
 
Available Versions of this Record
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 49 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 66 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 02 Dec 2014, 04:12:28 EST by System User on behalf of Centre for Youth Substance Abuse